ESP in COMBAT

Copyright 2002, 2003, by Bob Fryer bfryer@teleport.com

Psychic experience in the military; primarily in the Vietnam War. Certain technology and other items are also noted. Most of these volumes are in my personal library. I would appreciate being informed regarding any psychic or intuitive events which I may not have noted. Unfortunately, many of these writers did not include such events which undoubtedly occurred.

Four very important items have emerged: two references to voices (keyword=voice) and two references to ringing of the ears (keyword=ringing). I have personal experience with both phenomena.

The Marines may have declared dowsing to be top secret, as it seems to have 'disappeared' from their lexicon. Very unusual for such a useful tool known to have saved lives. (See Christopher Bird.)

The notation "None noted." may indicate:
a) Nothing decribed above noticed in the item; or
b) That I read the item before I began making the notes. (Less likely.); or
c) That I have not read the item.

March 2003 additions

Anderson, Charles R.,  THE GRUNTS;  New York: Berkley Books, 1984 [Presidio Press, C. 1976].  Vietnam.  0-425-10403-6 
p.27, "And there are days on which the the worst enemies of the American field unit are exhaustion, stupidity, and the short-sightedness of its own leaders and troops.";
p.50-, Examples demonstrating the comment above;
p.58, 'Army marches on its stomach,' IF it has water;
p.61, Troops falling from heat exhaustion, stumbling, highly susceptible to booby traps, ambush;
p.63, Idiocy of having dehydrated troops carrying water for others;
p.147-9, Poor housekeeping in a mortar pit, stupidity, kills 13, wounds 28;
p.154, More info on above.

Anderson, Kent,  SYMPATHY for the DEVIL, A NOVEL;  New York: Warner Books, 1987.  Vietnam.   0-446-35222-5
p.11, Comment suggests ignorance re physics of ammo, explosions follow path of least resistance;
p.12, Mascot (dog) hates Vietnamese;
p.38, Supply NCO corruption, how it worked;
p.46, LRRP-type with very noisy gear;
p.74, Drunken violence against fellow troops;
p.86, Same as above;
p.113, "...His senses were heightened to the point...";
p.172-4, Some medical aspects of combat;
p.203, Reading chicken entrails;
p.218, "...I've got that feeling..." [Premonition of combat];
p.225, Comment on sixth sense; brief out-of-body experience;
p.268, Landmine detection;
p.275, Landmine detection [Questionable scenario.].

Burford, John,  LRRP TEAM LEADER;  New York: Ivy Books, 1994.  Vietnam.  0-8041-1051-3   94-94035 
p.27, "...There wasn't a letdown of the adrenaline flow, and we operated at a peak level all of the time..."
p.29, Carried cigarettes and poncho on missions--'no-no's with many units [smell and noise could alert enemy];
p.39, Very poor radio contact;
p.63, NVA wood-chopping used as coded signals;
p.67, "...I had a bad feeling about the [area of operations]..." [The troops that relieved them were hit hard the next day, by the enemy.];
p.78, Cooking a meal in the bush [5 man team], dangerous behavior. That night, enemy came searching for them, but missed them;
p.83, "...The sense of smell was one of the best detection weapons that we had, and it worked for them [too]...";
p.110, "...If there is anything I miss about the war, it is the closeness we developed...";
p.120-, The BAD mission--Nov. 20, 1968--poor planning, problems, disaster for other team;
p.134, "...I told Williams that I could smell gooks up ahead, and Harris did too..." [Correct];
p.138-9, Details of Nov. 20th;
p.141, More details of poor planning;
p.148, "...I felt nervous about making the [mission]...";
p.149, Mis-plotted artillery fire;
p.172, Helo insertion dangerously close to target;
p.179, Smoking cigarette while on ambush;
p.196, Pressure, on return to USA, to skip reporting of heath problems.

Brennan, Matthew,  BRENNAN'S WAR, VIETNAM 1965-1969;  New York: Pocket Books, 1986 [Presidio Press, 1985].   Good candidate for Top Ten Vietnam books.  85-518   0-671-70595-4 
p.8, Greeted by hyperbole for M-16 rifle [12/65];
p.13, Worked in artillery fire direction center 12 hours per day, required to dig bunkers, man the defensive lines when 'off duty' [Could this be the cause of some 'friendly fire' casualties?];
p.16, "...Some of them [townspeople] gave us looks of pure hatred...";
p.17, "...I would one day be able to hear a mortar round as it left the tube...";
p.57-8, Man professes death premonition, wounded, probably self-inflicted;
p.61, NVA copies our jungle boots;
p.62, "...His rifle [M-16] had jammed after a single shot, and he had thrown it at them..." [He had surprised VC, they fled.];
p.82, Civilians die if they run from helicopters;
p.87, "...It was the feeling that I sometimes got when I knew the enemy were close but still out of sight...  I think there's [VC] in that banana grove..." [Typical location, correct conclusion.];
p.89, "...His rifle [M-16] had jammed after one shot..." [He hit the VC point man, they fled.];
p.91, VC kill old woman who refused to give them rice;
p.101, "...But this silent village was eerie..."  The back trail was planted with booby-traps after they had passed;
p.108, Bending over to tie a shoelace may have saved his life;
p.148, Fraudulently biased news reporting;
p.170, "...killed two armed NVA women... wearing American camouflaged jungle fatigues...;
p.175, Communists cause destruction of prosperous communities;
p.180, Bored men adopt self-destructive behavior;
p.187, "...addicted to constant danger..."; Julian Bond exacerbates racial tensions;
p.188, "My country had changed in the past three years, and I had not...";
p.196, "...the Army's spirit had changed after Tet...";
p.201, Questioning the destruction of villages;
p.205, Defensive army has discipline problems;
p.212, Enemies met... "Both of them fired until their rifles were empty, missing completely, then turned and ran...";
p.222, "I read the books by Bernard Fall for the third time and realized...";
p.227, Emergency... "I remembered the right [radio] frequency... no one had given it to me..." [Subliminal or Reverse Speech?];
p.244, Enemy attack fails from lack of proper preparation;
p.245, Men killed and wounded... "...Those of us who weren't hurt continued to eat lunch.";
p.256, Disillusioned, wins battlefield commission;
p.261, He was killed... "...I had known what the ending would be that night in the officer's club..." [Green lieutenants have short life spans.];
p.270, "...I will never forgive myself for ignoring my instinct about that trail." [Men died.];
p.280, President Nixon lies about operations in Vietnam [1969].

Chambers, Larry,  DEATH IN THE A SHAU VALLEY: L Company LRRP's in Vietnam, 1969-70;  New York: Ivy Books, 1998.  Many relevant appendices.  0-8041-1575-3   98-92823 
p.4, "...I got real good at spotting signs of the enemy before he spotted me. Some of the guys said that I had a sixth sense, intuition, in the jungle, but the truth was my sensory awareness had already been fine tuned..." [Perhaps.];
p.11, "...One of our higher-ups had the bright idea that we should insert _in_ the mine field, reasoning the NVA wouldn't expect us there--a Vietnam version of military intelligence...";
p.25, "...Something made me stop. In the back of my mind a warning sounded: Hey, wake up, jerk. Something is about to happen. [Nothing did. Perhaps this instinct guided him around the threat?? See p.28: "That night I decided that I'd had enough."];
p.26, Reflecting on a buddy's accurate death premonition;
p.45, "...McCabe had a sixth sense--when his ears started to ring, there were gooks around...  Without fail...";
p.46, "Anderson told us later that McCabe said he had a really bad feeling about that patrol. Anderson wasn't real excited about the mission either...
    McCabe's ears were ringing like crazy..."  [They were hit, hard.];
p.131, "Everybody figured she barked simply because gooks like to eat dog, but I think she had dog intuition.";
p.172, "...and use my gut to determine if the guys could cut the mustard...";
p.177-8, List of patrol techniques, tips;
p.179-85, Patrol techniques and use of human senses in obtaining combat intelligence.

Crawford, C.S.,  THE FOUR DEUCES, A Korean War Story;  New York: Pocket Books, 1990.  Marines.  0-671-70562-8 
Back cover: "...used his uncanny talent for judging distance to direct artillery..."
p.29, "...I knew almost instantaneously the distances involved...";
p.112, "...All I can say is that I can just look at it and right away I know what it [distance] is..." [Note: I know a man who can shoot ground levels, gradients, in his head, estimate cubic yardage to be removed or added, and compute quantity of paving materials needed.];
p.114, "...It's like you have invisible antennae, feeling... willing yourself to... it's sort of like a sixth sense or intuition...";
p.134-38, "...I got goose bumps... a premonition of bad luck..." "...I was breathing fast... almost hyperventilating... no physical exertion... scared... ears ringing... that ringing..." "...I knew that we had a death coming to us..."  [Moments later North Korean mortars killed two of his best friends, at least five others, wounded many more.];
p.262, "...He was the only ground commander that I ever had who took the time to tell his grunts why they had to do certain things..." ; Man killed by mine after "'...[Lt.] just got through tellin' us to watch where we walked...'";
p.267, Lt. said, "...We're going to have to pay for the last few easy weeks..." [Two days later he was killed.];
p.334, Men have strong feelings that enemy are slipping up for a night attack. Correct.

Culberstson, John J., 13 CENT Killers, The 5th Marine Snipers in Vietnam;  New York: Ballantine Books PRESIDIO, 2003.   0-345-45914-8  [There is enough information in this book for a good magazine article or two.]
p.16, Estimation of wind speed;
p.19, "...the Americans as they invaded...";
p.21, "...Viet Cong... at war since 1946... with the Japanese... (etc.)" [?];
p.53, VC elimination of intelligentsia;
p.101, "...all Marines fought for each other...";
p.123, Misuse of snipers;
p.126, M-14 replaced by M-16;
p.132, Proper use of snipers;
p.145, Chinese ammo uses steel cores rather than lead [? - was he referring to armor piercing ammo?];
p.146, Misuse of snipers;
p.147, Proper use of snipers;
p.158, Jungle noise as warning system;
p.163, "...pre-World War II conflicts against the Japanese..." [??];
p.190, Accurate 100 yard shooting with cal. .45 Colt 1911 model service pistol;
p.220, "...When the hairs on the backs of the point scouts' necks pricked up...".

Donahue, James C.,  BLACKJACK-33;  New York: Ivy Books, 1999.  Vietnam.  Mobile Guerrilla Force.  Index.  0-8041-1764-0   99-90451 
p.1, "...he paused every few steps while his brain sorted every shred of stimulus for possible danger...";
p.7, Failure of promised support; "'Many VC this area,' said Luc..." [correct.]
p.55-60, Very interesting description of marksmanship training for Cambodians;
p.61, Insect repellent mixed with lanolin;
p.143-, Cambodian politics;
p.145, TBQ-10 radar controlled Sky Spot night bombing system;
p.147, Misuse of units;
p.180,  20-ton VC rice cache, bags labeled 'Continental Grain Company, New York';
p.185, "...Except for a woodpecker tapping out what sounded like Morse code, everything was quiet..." [Or VC?]; booby trap;
p.187, High-carbon-content ammunition jams M-16s;
p.195, Men sense danger;
p.197, "...The enemy soldier looked up and sniffed the air. He sensed something... Our bodies and clothes stank."

Ericson, Don, and John L. Rotundo,  CHARLIE RANGERS;  New York: Ivy Books, 1989.  Vietnam. Roster.  88-91240   0-8041-0288-0  
p.57, [D.E.] "...It always amazed me when we could actually smell the enemy...";
p.59, [D.E.] "...if someone saw something... It was as if all eyes, ears and noses were in sync with each other...";
p.85, [D.E.] One of ours had been killed.  "An eerie feeling crossed through my body and I somehow knew it was someone from (Team) 3-1, but I sat silently, not really knowing." [Correct];
p.103, [J.L.R.] Smoking a cigarette in the field. [Enemy could sometimes smell them from 1/4 mile away.];
p.112, [D.E.] Six helicopters delivering men for a stealth mission. [That's a lot of noise.];
p.121, [D.E.] Grass fire swept over their position--there was plenty of warning.  Rather than burying their explosives in the bottoms of their foxholes and starting backfires, they chose to blow the claymores and grenades, let fire sweep over them. Minor burns, mission thus compromised.;
p.130, [D.E.] "...Without a kill or a contact, a mission was just a walk in the woods. A walk in the woods made men lazy and very careless.";
p.135, [D.E.] Reaction force (to a contact with enemy) comes in; one soldier has boom-box to ear, listening to music, rifle slung from shoulder;
p.138, [J.L.R.] Men using camoflauge uniforms, skin paint, only to wear bright silver wings on hats;
p.145, [J.L.R.] Six men charge 80-100 enemy, who drop weapons and flee;
p.146, [J.L.R.] "...{Viet scout] acted as though he didn't want to go on the mission. [He and three others were then wounded.];
p.149, [J.L.R.] Ambushed walking through clearing;
p.180, [J.L.R.] Smoking a cigarette in the field.

Fitz-Enz, Col. David G.,  WHY A SOLDIER?  A Signal Corpsman's Tour from Vietnam to the Moscow Hot Line;  New York: Ballantine Books, 2001.  Index.  0-8041-1938-4   00-107753 
p.23, "...'You [Americans] are very dangerous people; you say one thing and do another.'...";
p.24, Problems with M-16 rifle;
p.33, Watching movies in the evening, out in the field. [???];
p.45, General goes off half cocked;
p.48, Christmas time, American people send gifts to troops;
p.72, The negative bias of the journalists;
p.108, "The generals don't have a clue as to what the war was about.";
p.121, Army assigns color-blind man as cable splicer [wires are differentiated by color];
p.165, Awful description of use of 'dog tag' to identify body;
p.252, Communications problems caused by Alaska earthquake 1964;
p.259, Earthquake effects on houses in Japan;
p.274, Learning to pick people for jobs;
p.301-4, Supply cannot provide proper weapon for officer [Vietnam];
p.305, More problems getting weapons for combat;
p.308, Better system for selecting battalion commanders; Mentally, hearing the important information from several radios [Been there, done that.];
p.313, Soldier with high school diploma cannot read or write;
p.323, A seriously incompetent colonel;
p.390, 1970s, revolution in Army Command and General Staff College.

Gadd, Charles,  LINE DOGGIE, Foot Soldier in Vietnam;  New York: Pocket Books, 1987.  101st Airborne.  0-671-66243-0   87-9216 
p.24, "pot head" goes berserk;
p.31, Men killed because damaged mortar ammo sent to troops instead of being destroyed;
p.32, When civilians disappear, enemy is near;
p.41, "...air was charged with the sensation of danger..." Hue, Tet, 1968;
p.50, Errant artillery hits building filled with families of ARVN troops;
p.60, VC mortars misidentified as 80mm;
p.86, Experienced Vietnamese scout, careless gun handling kills American;
p.139, "The sensation of danger hung in the air..." Enemy confirmed;
p.140, Lieutenant and his RTO walk blindly into enemy position, Lt. killed;
p.149, Sympathy for civilians dissipates in enemy controlled area;
p.150, Leeches;
p.151, Good leadership removes dumb order;
p.154, Forcing civilian into obvious booby trap--fatal;
p.155, "...we grew more and more careless..." [Exhaustion];
p.162, "'I'll go... but something tells me not to...' Now... he was dead...";
p.192, New officer kills man during weapons demo;
p.208, New 2nd Lt. demands salute from man with injured left arm in sling and right arm encumbered by multiple items;
p.211, "...ordered to move to center of paddy where there was no cover..." Enemy opened fire;
p.212, Scout dog... German shepherd... "meaner than a snake... dogs could sniff booby traps...";
p.213, Frustrations with civilians;
p.214, Man mistreats, murders civilian;
p.220, "...It was an accepted thing to cheat on a body count report...";
p.227, VC murder civilians to get compliance;
p.230, Author nearly murdered wounded prisoner.

Gantter, Raymond,  ROLL ME OVER, An Infantryman's World War II;  New York: Ivy Books, 1997.  Good reading.  96-94893   0-8041-1605-9 
p.55, Fitting in with average GIs is difficult for an educated man;
p.56, U.S. replacements trudging in 12-inch mud wearing 6-inch shoes;
p.63, Concealed U.S. troops suffer shelling, died, because general insisted on exposing himself on a ridge;
p.78, Idiotic officers cause unnecessary discomfort for cold troops;
p.101, Man, nerves shot, is a danger to the men around him; ignored by officers;
p.102, Fighting units were badly, dangerously, depleted while replacements were idle in the rear areas;
p.103, Troubles of finding shelter from weather;
p.141, Winter clothing issued in mid-January, when Battle of the Bulge is winding down;
p.167, Attacking through mine field;
p.323, Walked into well-prepared ambush at obvious location;
p.347, Children playing with hand grenade... pin worked loose...;
p.356, Dealing with a premonition of death;
p.360-, Last day of European war; opening gates to stalags;
p.382-, Senior officer abuses troops in formation.

Goshen, Bill,  WAR PAINT;  New York: Ballantine Books, 2001.  LRP/Rangers, Vietnam.  Index.  0-345-44491-4
p.12, "...men [sent] into dangerous situations without all the equipment and support they needed...";
p.40, Suicidal assignment, men faked patrol;
p.47, Team integrity, compromised;
p.55, VC and NVA attacks on May 5, 1968;
p.65, Failure to properly credit activities;
p.67, Inappropriate assignments... charges of lying about results;
p.73, Suicidal orders from officers in the rear, survival by luck;
p.75, Suicidal orders from officers in the rear, troops ambushed;
p.82, Difficulties of patrolling in recently defoliated area; "...neither heard nor saw any sign of life, plant or animal..."; 
p.93, "...we were expendable...";
p.108, Attacked by helicopter, no injuries;
p.109, Caught at edge of Arc Light raid;
p.129, Improper assignment, caught by booby traps;
p.144, Change of unit designations;
p.157, "...he had a bad feeling about [the mission]..."; didn't go;
p.159, "...I had an eerie feeling... [about] pretty heavy combat..."; [Four died, two survived.];
p.173, Prayer chain, 'miraculous' improvement;
p.186, Officer ignores warning of attack;
p.194, Sick orders from commander in aircraft; threat of court martial for NOT abandoning wounded comrades.

Hopkins, William B.,  ONE BUGLE NO DRUMS;  New York: Avon Books, 1986.  Korea. Appendix, Bibliography.  Appendix.  Bibliography.  0-380-70455-2  86-3490 
p.55, 'Digging in' as a normal procedure;
p.73, November 2nd, expecting battle with Chinese troops;
p.75, Nov. 12th, prisoner says Chinese are there in large numbers;
p.86-7, More info on Chinese intervention;
p.92, N. Koreans indicate Chinese troops began entering on on Oct. 12th;
p.98, Negative aspects of bombing villages of neutral peasants;
p.105, Counting enemy casualties by number of friendly rounds fired;
p.110-11, News media has better intelligence than MacArthur's headquarters;
p.121, Chinese troop strengths, indicators;
p.122, MacArthur not impressed;
p.125, Nov. 28th, MacArthur's staff wakes up;
p.133, "...effective firepower means 'bullets hitting people.'";
p.150, "'Well, Cap'n Barrow's intuition is good enough for me...'";
p.153, "...He knew every man in his company, and the strength and weaknesses of each,...";
p.175, Disaster averted by snowstorm;
p.201, Marine and Navy planes change the tide of battle;
p.202, Apparent death premonitions, "'I don't know how they knew, but they knew...'";
p.206, Public opinion and use of atomic bomb;
p.210, Supply problems for Marines;
p.211, S.L.A. Marshall's appraisal of Marines;
p.229, Misuse of firepower in Vietnam, see item for page 98.

Ketwig, John,  ...AND A HARD RAIN FELL;  New York: Pocket Books, 1985.  Vietnam.  0-671-68054-4   85-5653 
p.49-66, Terrifying convoy to a firebase under attack, and night under heavy fire;
p.73, Story of booby-trapped dogs;
p.100, Footnote regarding material by Ward S. Just;
p.160, "...I'm not the same, Mama; and I don't like the person I've had to become..." [Letter home];
p.176, Effects of terror;
p.216, "...Ego massage for the lifers had higher priority than critical parts that might save a man's life...";
p.253, Atomic bombs in Thailand [??].

King, Bob,  THE FINAL MISSION: SPOOKY 8;  New York: St. Martin's Paperbacks, 2002.  Vietnam, Cambodia, Columbia.  Very good reading.   0-312-97145-1
p.4, "...When it came to 'gut feeling'... It had to be unanimous.";
p.6, Remote viewers;
p.7, "...These radios used a special 'frequency-hopping' chip..."; Bone induction earphones;
p.19, Hi-tech surveillance equipment;
p.35, Counting paces [distance];Eyesight is secondary at night, tricks to avoid trip-wires;
p.38, Children and landmines;
p.44, Quiet jungle means danger;
p.45, Remote control of surveillance equipment;
p.48, Hi-tech surveillance equipment;
p.54, "...everything I sensed [was] processed at a tremendous rate..."; Ambushed;
p.62, Educated paranoia regarding booby-trapped equipment;
p.63, Normal jungle sounds are comforting;
p.88, Vibes regarding bad mission;
p.92-3, Hiding top-secret information as "insurance";
p.127, "...For some reason I had an intense dislike for these men..." [They were drug runners.];
p.142, National Reconnaissance Office, distrust; "...the world is... wired..."
p.143, Sensing danger at a new location, dogs too quiet [It was safe.];
p.148, Dealing with stress and loss of friends;
p.173, Government remote viewing program alive and well;
p.193-4, Sensing danger.

Lanning, Michael Lee,  INSIDE THE CROSSHAIRS, Snipers in Vietnam;  New York: Ivy Books, 1998.   98-92560   0-8041-1620-2
p.18, Accuracy of bows and arrows;
p.113, Qualifications for snipers, must be right handed because of the design of bolt action rifles;
p.175, Excellent trained sniper killed when used as infantryman, which he should have been supporting.

Leppelman, John,  BLOOD ON THE RISERS, An Airborne Soldier's Thirty-five Months in Vietnam;  New York: Ivy Books, 1991.  91-91829   0-8041-0562-6 
p.6, "...harassment... to make the weak quit...";
p.21, Issued M-16 in very poor shape;
p.46, "...my sixth sense was already developing...";
p.53, "...I was almost sleep walking in the intense heat..." [Not a good idea.];
p.54, "...Laying about eighteen inches from my body was a bamboo viper... coiled..."  It had been on another man's shoulder, staring "eye-to-eye..."; M-16 jammed in combat after six shots;
p.56, Questioning why M-16 was used under jungle conditions;
p.60, Sleeping... "Something was wrong.  I opened my eyes but didn't move..." Five feet away, in the water, a boa constrictor was staring at him;
p.66, "...of the sixteen men who were dead, nine had M-16s that were jammed..." ;
p.68, They had been sucked into a trap by a decoy. [Above];
p.70, Man killed when playing hot potato with a grenade;
p.71, Test firing... "My rifle would jamb after six to ten rounds..."  Others were having trouble with their M-16s;
p.73, Jungle silent, men moving noisily, shouting to each other. Dangerous;
p.86, Seven men killed and thirty wounded by friendly fire, see p.96;
p.89, Likely enemy ahead, moved into open area, hit by enemy fire, a trap;
p.98, Caught in crossfire, enemy in front, helo door gunners behind;
p.99, Infrared nightscope (April 1967);
p.101, "...This war was being fought badly...";
p.122, "'...I've got a bad feeling about Charlie company's future...'";
p.124, Major harasses troops just in from jungle;
p.133, Dangerous effects of fatigue;
p.134, Starlite scope, May '67;
p.134-5, 3:00 A.M., brilliant UFO rises from jungle below ridge bivouac, disappears into sky; the UFO apparently panicked enemy on opposite ridge, they fled leaving gear behind;
p.136, Helmet struck by fragment from friendly fire;
p.146, Battlefield paranoia;
p.176, Body count fabrications; "My sixth sense told me that if we stayed in Dak To, we weren't going to make it..."
p.181, Some troops refuse combat;
p.185, Medical care refused for sick troops--manpower shortage;
p.209-11, Company hit very hard at Dak To;
p.230, Tet, NVA executes civilians;
p.231, Observations on Tet, ARVN, corruption;
p.237, "I... had a bad feeling about the boat..." [Bad situation.];
p.273, Improvements to M-16;
p.280-1, Ordered to sight in his rifle [Good!]; Preparations for recon patrol; No cigarettes on patrol;
p.285, Smell, and toilet habits on patrol; Physical toll of stress on patrol.

Linderer, Gary A.,  SIX SILENT MEN, 101st LRP/Rangers, Book Three;  New York: Ivy Books, 1997.  Vietnam.  97-93362   0-8041-1567-2 
p.25-8, "...The hair on the back of my neck was beginning to stand at attention..."; team leader's call for extraction denied; "...[the new men] sensed our anxiety..."; changed location after dark, observed light at old location;
p.35, "...something was wrong. I could feel it..." [rappelling into new enemy fortifications, other helo misses location];
p.39, "...I awoke with a start... heavy fog... saw something out of corner of my eye..." [3 NVA among sleeping Americans];
p.52, "...at 0130 hours in the morning everything suddenly grew quiet. It was as if the frogs and crickets had just gotten the word to stop chirping on cue... two or three minutes later... [activity resumed]" [This type of silence often indicates hostiles nearby.  In this case, it could have been subliminal geological signals.];
p.57-, Attack on Firebase Jack: "misuse" of Lurps pays off [for once];
p.63, Seeing commo wire in grass on dark night;
p.67, "...sensed that something was about to happen...";
p.71, Sudden quiet gives warning of imminent assault;
p.92-, The Premonition:  Nightmare eerily predicts incident which occurs a month later;
p.104, Radio transmission attracts lightning, disaster;
p.112, New Starlight scope model, 1969;
p.114, "Sensing danger..." [found recent enemy activity];
p.128, Mother knew something was wrong as son returned to Vietnam, he was killed;
p.139, "...something told [him] to check it out..." [found cache of enemy rockets];
p.168, "...something was wrong... the mission didn't feel right...";
p.171-, Vietnamese scout suddenly reports many NVA in area; both radios go dead at same time; 6 hours later, one of the works again; "...air around patrol suddenly seemed to grow heavy..." [They are surrounded.];
p.190, "...[he] got a weird feeling and held back...";
p.208, Teams out without adequate support;
p.223, Six man team killed while sleeping;
p.226, New men sent into high-risk areas;
p.228-9, Radio commo problems;
p.235, Man had premonition of death [accurate];
p.237-, Wiretap mission;
p.243, "...security had gotten a little lax... Rangers had given in to the temptation to light up cigarettes--a no-no on any long range patrol." [They were hit.] ;
p.261, "[He] had an uncanny ability to sense when the team was being followed...";
p.281-5, Team ambushed when ordered to retrieve "battle-trophies" for a colonel; 
p.288, Inappropriate mission, ambushed;
p.318, "...immediately sensed that something wasn't right.  He couldn't tell what was causing the hair on the back of his neck to stand up... Alarm bells began going of in [his] head..."  Moments later, the unseen enemy opened fire.;
p.320, "...The survivors attributed their survival to good luck, intuition, or divine intervention."; "...most of them left any vestiges of a sixth sense in the trash barrel...";
p.321, "...they smelled... the strong odor of Vietnamese soldiers...";
p.325, "Everything was abnormally quiet... Ambush!";
p.328, Officers get medals, enlisted men are bypassed;
p.331, "...they felt as if they were being watched..."  Enemy rockets landed around them just before midnight.

Marshall, S.L.A.,  The Battle for BIRD;  New York: Warner Books, 1968.  Vietnam.  0-515-35314-0 
p.21, Defenses nearly nonexistent;
p.26, "'...something big is bound to happen...'";
p.27, "...a mutual feeling of edginess...";
p.78, M-16 jammed;
p.79, Many green soldiers together; M-16 jammed; M-60 and 4 M-16s jammed;
p.131, "...the smell of danger.";
p.132, Out for an ambush with only one round for his M-79 grenade launcher;
p.133, Lured into a trap;
p.146, "...Some instinct told him that the enemy must be present in large numbers..." [True];
p.164, M-16 jammed.

Marvicson, Dennis J., and Jerold A. Greenfield,  MAVERICK;  New York: Jove Books, 1990.  Helicopters. Vietnam.  Enjoyable.  0-515-10662-3
p.4, Note to authors: Modern cannons fire shells, not bullets;
p.12, Description of a remarkable man;
p.19, Psyching out pilot trainee with 'hover switch';
p.45, Dismay at children fighting war;
p.81, Disregard for hands-on intelligence leads to fiasco; Effects of stress;
p.117, Father Wah hosting VC meeting;
p.130, Allusion to sixth sense;
p.206, Bullets snapping by described as 'little bees' [Was he really there?]; Poor security, reaction to attack on base;
p.280, Man who ran SOLO LRRP missions of 30 to 40 days.

McGlone, Randall K.,  GUTS & GLORY;  New York: Pocket Books, 1992.  Marines.  Vietnam.  0-671-76062-9 
p.2-, "...a nagging feeling told me that something was amiss..."; military age men in village (unusual); on return through village, ambushed, many Marines die;
p.8, Heightened senses in combat;
p.32, Problems with M-16 rifles;
p.57, Heightened senses in combat;
p.60, I suspected a great number of NVA forces in the neighborhood, and I knew we would find them..." [Correct];
p.77, 'Sleeping' while walking [Dangerous behavior];
p.78, Evacuation of very seriously wounded only;
p.87, Very troublesome enemy soldier killed by blindly thrown grenade, "...What a miracle!...";
p.108, On the line, very sick, "...I knew that tomorrow I would die." [Wrong];
p.109, Misuse of trained men;
p.116, Nearly every man in a platoon killed, surviving sergeant in shock, found covered by bodies of his men;
p.125, NVA found with large quantities of medical supplies from USA;
p.133, "...but they are still there. I can feel it.";
p.147, "I had a bad feeling, a premonition... 'A voice kept saying 'Where the hell are the NVA?''" [Found out, the hard way.].

Meacham, William C.,  LEST WE FORGET: The Kingsmen, 101st Aviation Battalion, 1968;  New York: Ivy Books, 1999.  Helicopters.  Vietnam.  0-8041-1917-1   99-90740 
p.65, At beginning of Tet attacks, instinct guides pilot to spot between two bunkers; he stops VC penetration;
p.92, Flying down a road, in a line, inside a tunnel of trees, at night, without lights, no moon, "...It was crazy!...";
p.94, Dismay at failure to be informed of facts before going on mission above;
p.151, U.S. sniper, 2ndLt. Mike Clark kills NVA general;
p.242, Meacham avoids booby-trapped helo pad, "...something didn't look right...";
p.248, "...I can feel the son of a bitch watching me...";
p.271, "...no one [on the teams] seemed to feel good about the [mission] coming up..."  [Disaster].

Miller, Kenn,  SIX SILENT MEN, 101st LRP/Rangers, Book Two;  New York: Ivy Books, 1997.  Vietnam.  96-95197   0-8041-1564-8 
p.20, Unreal emphasis on body count;
p.35, Modified equipment and rations;
p.44-5, Failure to follow up on Tet successes;
p.46, Harassment of troops; failure to support LRRPs;
p.52, "...had a feeling that they were being watched...";
p.56, Intelligence flows mostly up, withheld from many units;
p.57, Misuse of trained men;
p.75, Failure to follow up on Tet successes;
p.81, "...eating... sensed a presence... feeling that someone was watching... black leopard stepped around man next to [him]...";
p.96, Doc Norton impaled by water buffalo;
p.101, "...At night, hearing was the dominant sense,...";
p.124, Misuse of Lurps;
p.139, Inserted at wrong location;
p.151, "...sometimes a sixth or seventh sense alerts people when they are being watched... one of the NVA soldiers raised his rifle and began to sweep his eyes..."
p.170, Captain harasses men, loses foot to booby trap in tent;
p.177, Team leader, Sgt., fails to follow SOP [See Nov. 20];
p.182, David Hackworth mentioned;
p.196, Macho man eats toad, poison skin fatal;
p.206, Bill Meacham, booby-trapped chopper pad, sixth sense;
p.207, "...feeling that they were being watched..." heard mortars being fired at them...;
p.223, "...Sergeant... always had his own ideas about..." [See Nov. 20, 1968];
p.226-7, "...he'd had his fill of [sergeant]..." [etc.];
p.237-, Nov. 20, 1968: Sergeant... fails to follow SOPs, team trapped, he and three others killed, seven wounded;
p.244, NVA brings up 40 pound mine;
p.283, Chapter on Lessons Learned;
p.287, Radios would not work under some conditions--dead zones.

Nolan, Keith William,  SAPPERS IN THE WIRE, The Life and Death of Firebase Mary Ann;  New York: Pocket Books, 1995.  Vietnam.  Index.  0-671-00254-6 
p.4, Training for reaction marksmanship; Mascot dog reacts violently towards perimeter, nothing seen, disregarded;
p.5, Officers relaxing... in a house made of glass...;
p.17, Bunker protection technique... rocks on roof;
p.23, Staff procrastination hurts defenses;
p.24, Get lost... get hit by friendly fire;
p.29, Comfort rather than protection...;
p.33, Dirty M-16 blows up;
p.40-41, Blatant inattention to defense;
p.43, ARVN refuse permission to fire on hostiles;
p.52, Poor security;
p.78, Misidentification of source of hostile fire;
p.94, Inexperienced officer;
p.97, "...[sergeant] had an uncanny sense of direction...";
p.105, Artillary officer had not checked the terrain on map;
p.106, Sergeant killed when following inept lieutenant's orders;
p.116, "'We're going to walk into an ambush real soon...'" [Correct];
p.121, Dog alerted to enemy, but missed ambush claymore;
p.131, "...The NVA were there--everyone could feel it..." [Correct];
p.143, "Something was going to happen. He could feel it..." [Night before disaster.];
p.144, "...He frequently found guards asleep when walking the bunker line...";
p.151, Calls to three bunkers out of twenty-two would be answered;
p.182, "...Most slept through their guard duty.";
p.188, "'He told me of this premonition the very night we were overrun...'";
p.194, "'...We had no idea of what was coming... it sure looked like [the ARVNs] did.'";
p.258, Complacency;
p.260, Hamburger Hill and FSB Airborne experience.

Parrish, Robert D.,  COMBAT RECON, MY YEAR WITH THE ARVN;  New York: St. Martin's Paperbacks, 1991.  Vietnam.  0-312-92713-4   90-49212
p.23, Booby-traps;
p.29, ARVN corruption;
p.49, Booby-trap failure;
p.76, Bogus awards for valor;
p.164, Tet 1968, intelligence failures, successes;
p.169, VC take shelter in gov friendly villages, we attack;
p.185, Poor ARVN unit performance;
p.199, Counter-battery radar;
p.272, Radio based intelligence;
p.276, "...I could sense the VCs presence... Everyone sensed that we were about to make contact...".

Peters, Dr. Bill,  FIRST FORCE RECON COMPANY, Sunrise at Midnight;  New York: Ivy Books, 1999.  Vietnam.  Very enjoyable.  0-8041-1873-6   98-93276
p.39, "...They had... tried to read each other's minds...";
p.57, Marines used big CH-46 helo to insert recon team [??];
p.59, Hush in jungle signals enemy presence; "'NVA, and lots of them'";
p.75, Sgt. Ayers'  advanced patrol techniques;
p.83, "...and the intuition of a well trained patrol... negated the need to talk.";
p.91, "...my eyes wide, senses peaked...";
p.108, Idiotic insertion of team into old firebase occupied by NVA;
p.125, Strong intuitive element saves man;
p.152, Using 'instinct' to select unfamiliar men;
p.156, "...I've got a bad feeling about that direction...";
p.169, Command's inability to handle intelligence load;
p.175, Two patrols intentionally meeting at night in jungle; "...Today, I know it was a miracle."

Picciotto, Richard, with Daniel Paisner,  LAST MAN DOWN;  New York: Berkley Books, 2002.  A Firefighter's Story of Survival and Escape from the World Trade Center.  2002-019522  0-425-18677-6
p.15, "...a plane had crashed into the tower... I knew that this was no accident.  I knew this in my gut... in my heart... in my head.";
p.44, "The [south] tower came down... The moment I heard it I knew...";
p.221, "...trusting my gut... I moved on faith and instinct...".

Sack, John,  COMPANY C, The Real War in Iraq;  New York: Avon Books, 1995.  Gulf War   94-33406   0-380-71752-2
p.42, De-humanizing the enemy;
p.98, 'Born again' type Christian struggles with need to kill; his alertness saves lives;
p.121, In Kansas... Young had foreseen that K___ would be one of the casualties.  K___ stepped on a landmine;
p.131, Two men killed when trooper attempts to crack ovoid bomblette against tank.

Sasser, Charles W.,  RAIDER;  New York: St. Martin's Paperbacks, 2002.  One man, four POW rescue raids in WW II, Vietnam.  Good read.   0-312-98249-6
p.27, "...They quickly developed a close working relationship that depended more upon instinct and understanding of each other than upon spoken communication...";
p.31, "...he actually felt his senses sharpening and coming alive...";
p.106, "...[His] imagination felt Jap eyes glaring at him...  He turned it off and felt his other senses sharpening...";
p.130, Heightened senses, night, in enemy territory... [As the point man for the raid on POW camp at Cabanatuan; see Ghost Soldiers, etc.];
p.152, "...Either the sentry possessed some acute sixth sense or the moon playing peek-a-boo with the clouds revealed something suspicious... he shouted a ringing challenge...";
p.212, "'I don't like this one, sir,' Rowe confided... He had this feeling." [They were sucked in a trap; he was taken prisoner.];
p.274, Effects on men of political aspects of war;
p.315, When headlines of the Son Tay raid were broadcast, she knew her husband was involved, again.

Sasser, Charles W., and Craig Roberts,  ONE SHOT--ONE KILL, American Combat Snipers, WW II, Korea, Vietnam, Beirut;  New York: Pocket Books, 1990].   0-671-68219-9 
p.8, "'...I felt eyes watching me...'";
p.11, Note on toilet habits while on patrol;
p.12, "'...It made me suspect a trap...'";
p.14, "'he's still there,' I whispered, 'I can feel him.'";
p.15, "'I experienced a strange feeling...  I suddenly knew that if I didn't shoot now I'd never have another opportunity...'" [He would have been dead.] "'...It had to be that sixth sense working...'";
p.30, "...If you grew up outdoors, you knew the difference [of movement] between animals and man.";
p.39, "...I had learned to memorize every detail of terrain after one quick peek...";
p.45, Dread of facing more machine guns and snipers;
p.55, Sniper, "...defecating in his pants to keep from moving...";
p.61, "'My guts tell me he is out there watching and waiting,' Zaitsev commented...";
p.129, Target senses the sniper;
p.133, Abysmal marksmanship training for recruits;
p.139-, Carlos Hathcock, destroying a company of NVA recruits;
p.162, Marine injured when he interfered with thieving rock ape;
p.168, Laying out a sniper's range card;
p.169, Firing across or near an obstacle alters perception of source of fire; effects of weather on ballistics;
p.170, Sight-in for 450 yards;
p.191, Dealing with the killing; With a price on his head, "I felt like somebody out there was watching me...";
p.195, About a wounded man, "'...It was like he knew he was giving me life when he gave me his pistol...'" [It saved his life.];
p.196, "'...Your awareness triples...'";
p.197, The enemy soldier stared at his hiding place, perhaps sensing that to react would mean his own death;
p.207-10, Inching through the grass, enemy patrollers pass 15 feet to either side; After dark, one soldier nearly stepped on him;
p.212, "...I mentally pulled myself into my 'bubble' where nothing could distract my attention...";
p.213, "'...Recon has tapped all the NVA phone lines...'".

Sledge, E. B.,  WITH THE OLD BREED AT PELELIU AND OKINAWA;  Novato, CA: Presidio Press, 1981.  WW II.  Index.  One of Top Ten books of Marines at war. The carnage and filth endured by enlisted Marines in battle.  Reread, 2003.
 The late author and book recently memorialized (2001) in a History Channel documentary, Sledgehammer: Old Breed Marine.
Sledge's widow commented on how to awaken a combat veteran--whisper his nickname in his ear.  [Then the wife/mate can desensitize him by adding "I love you".] 
p.11, Sleep deprivation: "...Combat guaranteed sleep of the permanent type only.";
p.12, "...our hearing became superkeen..."; "...The ear training also proved to be an unscheduled dividend..." for combat;
p.38, Japanese targeted corpsmen;
p.41, NCO disciplines Lieutenant on firing range;
p.42, "...I felt that... God had issued him to the Marine Corps...";
p.73, Expectation of banzai charges--not fulfilled;
p.93, "Suddenly, I heard a loud voice say clearly and distinctly, 'You will survive the war!'" [The others heard nothing.]; "...I believed God spoke to me that night on the Peleliu battlefield..."
p.97, Frontal assaults result in high casualties--and medals for the commanders;
p.147, Japanese document notes fatigued condition of Marines;
p.148, Mutilation of Marine corpses enrages men;
p.164, Red Cross girl greets troops just off battlefield, "...I resented her deeply.";
p.270, Coping with extreme fatigue;
p.305, Poorly trained replacements suffer extreme casualties.

Smith, Gary R., and Alan Maki,  DEATH IN THE JUNGLE, Diary of a Navy SEAL;  New York: Ivy Books, 1994.  Vietnam.  95-79867   0-8041-1341-6  
p.41, "...I only heard the ringing in my ears..." [Apparently natural 'white noise.']; "...Then I heard someone speak, which startled me until I realized the voice was only in my mind. It said, "Be careful, Smitty.";
p.104, "...I was keyed up. I had a strong premonition that [this] night would be the night. Somebody was going to lose his future." [Enemy probably killed.];
p.197, "...I had a strong feeling someone would die that [this] night. My instincts told me this... it wasn't going to be me..." [Enemy killed.];
p.212, Totally ignored by most civilians unless they wanted something--usually money;
p.231, "...knowing in my guts that some people were going to die before we got out of there..." [Enemy killed.];
p.232, "...I smelled the faint odor of nouc mam... confirmed once again that my senses of hearing and smell were extraordinary...";
p.233, "...Dexamil caused an alert high; but then abnormal drowsiness... not good...";
p.253, Inexperienced platoon sent to very dangerous area; were hit hard;
p.270, "...a gut feeling was speaking to me loud and clear. I just knew the enemy was coming..." [Enemy killed.].

Wade, Leigh,  TAN PHU, SPECIAL FORCES TEAM A-23 IN COMBAT;  New York: Ivy Books, 1997.  Vietnam, 1963.   96-94967   0-8041-1616-4
p.3, "This ill-fated operation...  Several of us... were uneasy about it from the beginning..." [Poor, rushed planning. It was a disaster.];
p.40, "'...so basically, you'll be outnumbered and outgunned...'";
p.50, "...My sense of hearing seemed to have become suddenly very acute...";
p.70, "...I could actually feel all of my physical senses grow and expand... eyesight... hearing... smell...";
p.126, "His article... was the prototype for the many twisted, biased, antiwar pieces that were to follow...";
p.136, "...was probably the first M-79 used in combat..." [September 1963];
p.160, "...I've got a really bad feeling about this operation..." [See p.3];
p.163, Air support provided too late--might have prevented disaster;
p.171, Nov. 1, 1963, revolt against Diem government;
p.192, VC in the militia group kill guards, camp overrun.

Walsh, Michael J., Lt.Cmdr. USN (Ret.) and Greg Walker,  SEAL!  New York: Pocket Books, 1994.  Vietnam, etc.  0-671-86853-5 
p.13, How to hide in public, no direct eye contact;
p.22, SEALs improve as alcohol consumption drops;
p.27, Importance of conditioning;
p.57, "...Only the simple succeeds in combat...";
p.58, Trainees terrify girls in USA.
p.67, Intuitive mother;
p.72, Sensing a trap when others are oblivious, correct;
p.85, Good and bad of eye-to-eye contact;
p.86, "...[He] could read me like a book... when in danger [he could see] the hair on the back of my neck [stand] out so straight...";
p.103, Don't trust US Army any more than ARVN;
p.106, "...I focused my attention elsewhere so as not to give off bad vibes [to enemy]... we had practised... using our peripheral vision...";
p.115, Corruption;
p.125, Phoenix program, more corruption;
p.128, GVN policy of using bombs against citizens rather than rooting out VC; CGAP intel program worked;
p.144, VC infrastructure; advisors forced to lead from the rear;
p.145, Misinformation to U.S. public; "...the most effective program against the VC was being dismantled by idiots..."
p.161, Avoiding staring, using peripheral vision;
p.176, Higher echelon interference prevented freeing of U.S. troops held as prisoners;
p.182, Intelligence photos not available because a request for them would compromise the mission;
p.190, "I didn't trust the former VC... I was getting that little feeling that this would be a bad day..." [Ambushed on way out.];
p.213, Problems with finding and correcting Navy security weaknesses;
p.214, Special warfare community, more security problems;
p.230, Misuse of assets, poor intelligence and planning costs lives on the Grenada mission;
p.234, CIA notifies Russians three days before Grenada;
p.240, "...A civilian airliner... would also make an excellent flying bomb and could be hijacked...";
p.241, A merchant ship could also be used against us... anything from a Douh [sic] to a pleasure cruiser...";
p.244-, Beirut, Lebanon operations.

West, Bing,  THE VILLAGE;  New York: Pocket Books, 2003 [1972].  Vietnam.   One of Top Ten Vietnam books.  0-7434-5757-9
p.23, Fear during night patrols;
p.83, "...Alerted by instinct, he had turned his attention...";
p.95, "...a shift in the night sounds... the frogs..." The enemy were approaching;
p.114, Villagers forced to ignore patrollers, for fear of being denounced to VC;
p.119-20, Cautious enemy point man apparently senses [or smells] ambush at night, retreats;
p.226, "...It was a battle fought... at such close quarters [and at night] that both sides used their senses of smell and hearing as much as their eyesight...";
p.235, The VC point man... "...and his suspicion [of trouble] was evidently so strong that..."  ...He was shot, stopping a major attack before it began;
p.250, "...the Marines smelled... so the Viet Cong could avoid them.";
p.309, Senior commanders failed to understand the nature of the war;
p.333, The VC sapper, leading the penetration, worked carefully through the wire; a single bullet, between his eyes, stopped the attack;
p.340, Patrolling in the dark... "...Foster... had the uneasy feeling that he was being stalked... was convinced that he was outclassed... he stopped... refused to budge... the man came looking for him...".

Yarborough, Col. Tom,  DA NANG DIARY;  New York: St. Martin's Paperbacks, 1990, 2002.  Vietnam.  Index.  0-312-98493-6 
p.46, "...The key was in developing situation awareness, a sort of sixth sense for evaluating everything going on around you.";
p.47, Pave Way, laser guided bombs [April 1970];
p.75-76, Memorizing minute details of miles of trails...;
p.113, Political aspects;
p.129, "...he seemed to have a sixth sense and an uncanny ability to..." "...[his] sixth sense... probably saved my life...";
p.201, "...a knack for listening to all five radios at once..." "...while my mind's eye projected ahead...";
p.213, Controller notices that team is being herded into trap; team leader continued direction, wounded, died of non-serious wound;
p.237, Trail sensor info;
p.299, Doppler radar, FLIR systems;
p.319, Diary item, why men fight, etc.

Young, Paul R.,  FIRST RECON--SECOND TO NONE, A Marine Recon Battalion in Vietnam,1967-68;  New York: Ivy Books, 1992.  Candidate for Top Ten Vietnam books.  92-90616   0-8041-1009-3
p.46, Drinking bad water without allowing time for halazone tablets to do their job;
p.59, "...I couldn't get my thoughts off the hills surrounding us... the enemy..."; poor choice of landing zone by the brass...; "It was then that I made the decision never to land in an LZ I had had bad feelings about... Again, I had the feeling that a dozen pair of eyes were watching my every move..." [Early next day they came under fire.]
p.82, Concerned about spending night at present location...  "When the feeling wouldn't go away, I asked for extraction, something I hadn't done before..."; Feeling guilty when no enemy appeared... "...but... the location was too exposed for comfort..."
p.85-8, "I did not like our newly assigned [area]..."; Upon landing, many signs of enemy presence.;  "...All of us could sense the enemy's presence...  The tension grew...  Then the jungle exploded."  One man was pinned down, but escaped unhurt--his pack was shot off his back--received Silver Star for his actions..
p.90, Poor communication, one man left on hill--temporarily;
p.96, "...at night I found myself deeply troubled by the picture of my daughter's face in the sky...";
p.124, "...But since shots were always being fired in the jungle..."  Disregarded. [Error, these were signal shots, as events proved.];
p.126, "...the permanent state of fatigue that had settled over most of us...";
p.138, Problems with artillery fire missions;
p.162-3, Marine defector lures other Marines to capture, death;
p.165, Taking food, etc. from Montagnard village;
p.167, M-16 problems, praise for Stoner system;
p.171, Death premonition [accurate]; unearned medals for officers;
p.181-2, "...I felt that Charlie [VC] was around..." [true]; American Samoan Marine mistaken for enemy, badly wounded;
p.192-3, M-16 problems, extraction problems reduced after firing 1200 rounds;
p.218, Colonel orders disastrous frontal assault;
p.237, Lost in fog, gives false position reports;
p.244, Tet truce, firing continues.

Zumbro, Ralph, and James Walker,  JUNGLETRACKS;  New York: Pocket Books, 1989.  NOVEL.  Vietnam.  0-671-66418-2
p.123, Ghost in a tank?;
p.201, Friends meeting friends in the jungle at night. [Extremely dangerous and difficult].


Complete list

Alexander, Ron,  Taking Fire, The True Story of a Decorated Chopper Pilot;  New York: St. Martin's Paperbacks, 2001.  Vietnam.  01-019159   0-312-98017-5
p.118, "...It was like I floated back out of the way and began observing the scene rather than participating in it...";
p.195, "...I had a premonition that I was going to die a fiery death..."  [Does NOT appear to have been a genuine premonition--it was a 'What if?' And he didn't die. - BF];
p.286, "...detached... seemingly out of my body...".

Ambrose, Stephen E.,  Band of Brothers;  New York: Touchstone, 1992, 2001;
D769.347  .A57   91-47684    0-671-76922-7   WWII paratroopers.
p.237  Winters, "...we all started walking with more care, with eyes in the backs of our heads..."

Ambrose, Stephen E.,  The Victors, Eisenhower and His Boys: The Men of WW II; New York: Simon & Schuster, 1998.  98-37808   0-684-85628-X   D756.A54
p.204-5, Hysteric blindness;
p.255, Horrific landmines.

Anderson, Charles R.,  THE GRUNTS;  New York: Berkley Books, 1984 [Presidio Press, C. 1976].  Vietnam.  0-425-10403-6 
p.27, "And there are days on which the the worst enemies of the American field unit are exhaustion, stupidity, and the short-sightedness of its own leaders and troops.";
p.50-, Examples demonstrating the comment above;
p.58, 'Army marches on its stomach,' IF it has water;
p.61, Troops falling from heat exhaustion, stumbling, highly susceptible to booby traps, ambush;
p.63, Idiocy of having dehydrated troops carrying water for others;
p.147-9, Poor housekeeping in a mortar pit, stupidity, kills 13, wounds 28;
p.154, More info on above.

Anderson, Kent,  SYMPATHY for the DEVIL, A NOVEL;  New York: Warner Books, 1987.  Vietnam.   0-446-35222-5
p.11, Comment suggests ignorance re physics of ammo, explosions follow path of least resistance;
p.12, Mascot (dog) hates Vietnamese;
p.38, Supply NCO corruption, how it worked;
p.46, LRRP-type with very noisy gear;
p.74, Drunken violence against fellow troops;
p.86, Same as above;
p.113, "...His senses were heightened to the point...";
p.172-4, Some medical aspects of combat;
p.203, Reading chicken entrails;
p.218, "...I've got that feeling..." [Premonition of combat];
p.225, Comment on sixth sense; brief out-of-body experience;
p.268, Landmine detection;
p.275, Landmine detection [Questionable scenario.].

Averill, Gerald P.,  MUSTANG, A Combat Marine;  New York: Pocket Books, 1987 [Presidio Press, 1986].  86-30485   0-671-64909-4    None noted.

Bainbridge, William G., SMA, and Dan Cragg,  TOP SERGEANT, The Life and Times of Sergeant Major of the Army;  New York: Ivy Books, 1995.   95-95317   0-8041-0758-0   None noted.

Baldwin, Sherman,  IRONCLAW, A Navy Carrier Pilot's War Experience;  New York: Bantam Books, 1996.  Gulf war, 1991.   0-553-57748-4   None noted.

Bender, Don,  SNAKE EATER, Army Special Forces in Vietnam;  New York: Dell Books, 1994.  0-440-21141-7
p.23, "...Montagnard warriors somehow had a sixth sense that warned them when the enemy was nearby."
p.78, Comment on sensory changes in combat;
p.131, Comment that '68 TET was victory for VC;
p.140, Description of DECE system for helicopter navigation.

Bird, Christopher,  The Divining Hand, the 500-Year-Old Mystery of Dowsing;  New York: E.P. Dutton, 1979.  Parapsychology, Dowsing, Biofeedback.  78-12280   Good!!  Chap 14, Dr. Z. Harvalik;  Chap 11, Matacia & Marines - The Marines Learn to Dowse [for landmines, etc.].  0-525-48038-2  BF1628 .B5

Bird, Christopher,  Book Review: MARGINS OF REALITY, by Robert G. Jahn and Brenda J. Dunne, in The American Dowser, Quarterly Digest, The American Society of Dowsers, Danville, Vermont, v28, n3, Summer, 1988, pp 43-50.
	More than a review!  Reveals much of the physics and psychology of ESP.

Blackburn, Tom,  The Jolly Rogers;  New York: Pocket Books, 1989.  WW II, Navy Fighter Squadron VF-17.  Index.  0-671-69493-6  
p.10, "...a really elevated level of self-awareness and... were needed... to survive...";
p.13, "...when all of us formed a band of brothers...";
p.185-7, "...we all saw a Hellcat execute an overhead run on the [B-25] bomber formation..."  [A Navy squadron leader fired on our bombers despite protests from his men.  This man then stood by while Blackburn was reamed for "not protecting" the bombers.  Situation was straightened out and the man was relieved of duty.];
p.195, Mysterious light guides rescuers; it may have been from another man who was not recovered.

Block, Mickey, and William Kimball,  Before the Dawn;  New York: Pocket Books, 1988.  Navy SEALs in Vietnam.  0-671-72607-2
p.72, Comment re the training cannot prepare you fo the reality;
p.88, Distrust of, and lack of respect for most officers;
p.116, Re the immensity of the 1968 Tet offensive, VC losses.

Bolger, Daniel P.,  Dragons at War, Land Battle in the Desert;  New York: Ivy Books, 1986.  "How the U.S prepared for Gulf War -- inside Army's National Training Center."  86-5018   0-8041-0899-4   None noted.

Bosiljevac, T.L.,  SEALS, UDT/SEAL Operations in Vietnam;  New York: Ivy Books, 1990.   89-63463   0-8041-0722-X   None noted.

Boyle, Jerome M.,  APACHE SUNRISE;  New York: Ivy Books, 1994.  94-96131   0-8041-1069-7  Vietnam, A Cobra pilot's experience.  None noted.

Brennan, Matthew,  HUNTER-KILLER SQUADRON, VIETNAM 1965-1972;  New York: Pocket Books, 1992 [Presidio Press, 1990].
Aero-Weapons, Aero-Scouts, Aero-Rifles   0-671-74453-4
p.178  "...All your senses are heightened and everything clicks into place..."

Brennan, Matthew,  HEADHUNTERS, Stories from the 1st Squadron, 9th Cavalry, in Vietnam 1965-1971;  New York: Pocket Books, 1988 [Presidio Press, 1987].  87-3811   0-671-66013-6   None noted.

Brennan, Matthew,  BRENNAN'S WAR, VIETNAM 1965-1969;  New York: Pocket Books, 1986 [Presidio Press, 1985].   Good candidate for Top Ten Vietnam books.  85-518   0-671-70595-4 
p.8, Greeted by hyperbole for M-16 rifle [12/65];
p.13, Worked in artillery fire direction center 12 hours per day, required to dig bunkers, man the defensive lines when 'off duty' [Could this be the cause of some 'friendly fire' casualties?];
p.16, "...Some of them [townspeople] gave us looks of pure hatred...";
p.17, "...I would one day be able to hear a mortar round as it left the tube...";
p.57-8, Man professes death premonition, wounded, probably self-inflicted;
p.61, NVA copies our jungle boots;
p.62, "...His rifle [M-16] had jammed after a single shot, and he had thrown it at them..." [He had surprised VC, they fled.];
p.82, Civilians die if they run from helicopters;
p.87, "...It was the feeling that I sometimes got when I knew the enemy were close but still out of sight...  I think there's [VC] in that banana grove..." [Typical location, correct conclusion.];
p.89, "...His rifle [M-16] had jammed after one shot..." [He hit the VC point man, they fled.];
p.91, VC kill old woman who refused to give them rice;
p.101, "...But this silent village was eerie..."  The back trail was planted with booby-traps after they had passed;
p.108, Bending over to tie a shoelace may have saved his life;
p.148, Fraudulently biased news reporting;
p.170, "...killed two armed NVA women... wearing American camouflaged jungle fatigues...;
p.175, Communists cause destruction of prosperous communities;
p.180, Bored men adopt self-destructive behavior;
p.187, "...addicted to constant danger..."; Julian Bond exacerbates racial tensions;
p.188, "My country had changed in the past three years, and I had not...";
p.196, "...the Army's spirit had changed after Tet...";
p.201, Questioning the destruction of villages;
p.205, Defensive army has discipline problems;
p.212, Enemies met... "Both of them fired until their rifles were empty, missing completely, then turned and ran...";
p.222, "I read the books by Bernard Fall for the third time and realized...";
p.227, Emergency... "I remembered the right [radio] frequency... no one had given it to me..." [Subliminal or Reverse Speech?];
p.244, Enemy attack fails from lack of proper preparation;
p.245, Men killed and wounded... "...Those of us who weren't hurt continued to eat lunch.";
p.256, Disillusioned, wins battlefield commission;
p.261, He was killed... "...I had known what the ending would be that night in the officer's club..." [Green lieutenants have short life spans.];
p.270, "...I will never forgive myself for ignoring my instinct about that trail." [Men died.];
p.280, President Nixon lies about operations in Vietnam [1969].

Burford, John,  LRRP TEAM LEADER;  New York: Ivy Books, 1994.  Vietnam.  0-8041-1051-3   94-94035 
p.27, "...There wasn't a letdown of the adrenaline flow, and we operated at a peak level all of the time..."
p.29, Carried cigarettes and poncho on missions--'no-no's with many units [smell and noise could alert enemy];
p.39, Very poor radio contact;
p.63, NVA wood-chopping used as coded signals;
p.67, "...I had a bad feeling about the [area of operations]..." [The troops that relieved them were hit hard the next day, by the enemy.];
p.78, Cooking a meal in the bush [5 man team], dangerous behavior. That night, enemy came searching for them, but missed them;
p.83, "...The sense of smell was one of the best detection weapons that we had, and it worked for them [too]...";
p.110, "...If there is anything I miss about the war, it is the closeness we developed...";
p.120-, The BAD mission--Nov. 20, 1968--poor planning, problems, disaster for other team;
p.134, "...I told Williams that I could smell gooks up ahead, and Harris did too..." [Correct];
p.138-9, Details of Nov. 20th;
p.141, More details of poor planning;
p.148, "...I felt nervous about making the [mission]...";
p.149, Mis-plotted artillery fire;
p.172, Helo insertion dangerously close to target;
p.179, Smoking cigarette while on ambush;
p.196, Pressure, on return to USA, to skip reporting of heath problems.

Burruss, Lt.Col. L.H. "Bucky",  MIKE FORCE;  New York: Pocket Books, 1989.  Vietnam   0-671-66945-1   None noted.

Camper, Frank,  L.R.R.P., The Professional;  New York: Dell Publishing, 1988.  0-440-20009-1   None noted.

Camper, Frank,  MERC: The Professional;  New York: Dell Publishing, 1989.  Mercenary, variou locations.   0-440-20215-9
p.42-43, A delightful example of how poorly trained OCS students can be 'slaughtered' in an exercise;
p.119, The Mercenary Association as a training device;
p.131, "...acting on a feeling, [I] never even looked directly at the telephone." He probably would have been shot if he had reached for the phone.

Caputo, Phil,  A RUMOR OF WAR;  New York: Ballantine Books, 1978.   76-29900   0-345-33122-2   None noted.

Carlock, Chuck,  FIREBIRDS;  New York: Bantam Books, 1997 [Summit Pub. Group, 1995].  Vietnam Helicopter combat.  95-50005   0-553-57705-0   None noted.

Cash, John A., John Albright, and Allan W. Sandstrum,  SEVEN FIREFIGHTS IN VIETNAM;  New York: Bantam Books, 1985.   0-553-25385-9   None noted.

Chambers, Larry,  DEATH IN THE A SHAU VALLEY: L Company LRRP's in Vietnam, 1969-70;  New York: Ivy Books, 1998.  Many relevant appendices.  0-8041-1575-3   98-92823 
p.4, "...I got real good at spotting signs of the enemy before he spotted me. Some of the guys said that I had a sixth sense, intuition, in the jungle, but the truth was my sensory awareness had already been fine tuned..." [Perhaps.];
p.11, "...One of our higher-ups had the bright idea that we should insert _in_ the mine field, reasoning the NVA wouldn't expect us there--a Vietnam version of military intelligence...";
p.25, "...Something made me stop. In the back of my mind a warning sounded: Hey, wake up, jerk. Something is about to happen. [Nothing did. Perhaps this instinct guided him around the threat?? See p.28: "That night I decided that I'd had enough."];
p.26, Reflecting on a buddy's accurate death premonition;
p.45, "...McCabe had a sixth sense--when his ears started to ring, there were gooks around...  Without fail...";
p.46, "Anderson told us later that McCabe said he had a really bad feeling about that patrol. Anderson wasn't real excited about the mission either...
    McCabe's ears were ringing like crazy..."  [They were hit, hard.];
p.131, "Everybody figured she barked simply because gooks like to eat dog, but I think she had dog intuition.";
p.172, "...and use my gut to determine if the guys could cut the mustard...";
p.177-8, List of patrol techniques, tips;
p.179-85, Patrol techniques and use of human senses in obtaining combat intelligence.

Chinnery, Philip D.,  LIFE ON THE LINE;  New York: St. Martin's Press, 1988.  Vietnam air combat.  88-29838   0-312-92010-5   None noted.

Christian, David, and William Hoffer,  VICTOR SIX;  New York: Pocket Books, 1990.  A most decorated Vietnam vet, Lurp.   0-671-74465-8
p.16, "...reported that he seemed to possess an unaccountable talent for sniffing out the presence of the enemy..."
p.102, Comment on use of intelligence; "...By now [they] had honed their senses.  They, too, could sniff out the enemy..."

Clancy, Tom, with Gen. Fred Franks, Jr. (Ret.),  Into the Storm, On the ground in Iraq;  New York: Berkley Books, 1998 [G.B. Putnam & Sons, 1997].   0-425-16308-3
p.34, "...Your intuition lights up.  Combat veterans call it a 'sixth sense.'..."
p.40-41, "Our troops found flashlights on many NVA.  Then it dawned on... that the enemy diet of fish and rice seriously limited their night vision..."  [In book after book, our recon troops reported that, at night, enemy using flashlights and lanterns would nearly step on them without seeing them.]
p.79, Re Franks' experience as an amputee intensified his commitment to the troops.
p.103, Comments re commanders being with the troops on the battlefield so that they can anticipate changing circumstances;
p.385, Comments re The Warrior Spirit -- and the intense feelings which heightened the senses to a new level.  "They put you in a zone.  I can't explain it..."

Clancy, Tom, with Gen. Chuck Horner,  Every Man A Tiger, The Gulf War Air Campaign;  New York: Berkley Books, 2000 [G.B. Putnam & Sons, 1999].   0-425-17292-9
p.31-5, Horner goes out-of-body, 'dies' in 'crash,' -- or should have...;
p.310, List of aircraft types;
p.355, "situational awareness"
p.438, Bombing the oil line valves;
p.475, Methods of making up target lists, dissention.

Clark, Johnnie M.,  GUNS UP!; New York: Ballantine Books, 1984.  84-90864   0-345-31507-3   A Marine machine-gunner vet's story.  None noted.

Clark, Johnnie M.,  SEMPER FIDELIS, A Novel; New York: Ballantine Books, 1988.  88-91966   0-345-33529-5   A Marine's story, Vietnam.  None noted.

Clark, Johnnie M.,  NO BETTER WAY TO DIE, A Novel; New York: Ballantine Books, 1995.  95-94450   0-245-38981-6
p.182, Death premonitions;
p.284, Knowing the answer to a question, without an overt clue;
p.300-338, Concise discussion of combat lore.

Clodfelter, Michael,  MAD MINUTES AND VIETNAM MONTHS;  New York: Zebra Books, 1988.  0-8217-2604-8   None noted.

Coleman, J.D.,  PLEIKU, The Dawn of Helicopter Warfare in Vietnam;  New York: St. Martin's Press, 1988.   88-1940   0-312-91469-5   None noted.

Constance, Harry, and Randall Fuerst,  Good To Go, The Life and Times of a Decorated member of the U.S. Navy's Elite SEAL Team Two;  New York: Avon Books, 1997.  Vietnam.  97-303   0-380-27966-0   VG87.C65 
p.11, ³...as if he had a sixth sense of where the enemy was...²;
p.66-7, Political realities at village level;
p.68, Body language under stress;
p.71, Seeing booby-traps at night;
p.76, Finding trip-wires in the dark;
p.101, A special man; ³...He moved like a shadow.  He knew where to step...²  Unfortunately, this did not extend to the use of explosives;
p.157, When running from enemy, leader changed direction without apparent reason; later they learned it avoided an ambush.  A metalic Œclick¹ in the darkness causes man to shoot enemy who were less than 10 feet away;
p.163-72, A very good war dog--used in some unusual ways;
p.185, Better have your weapon available; [My Tho (city), Tet, 1968]
p.187, VC/NVA armored vehicles [captured from ARVN?];
p.191, NVA attacking with .50 caliber machine guns;
p.199, CIA knew Tet attack was coming;
p.200, Stupid activities under fire;
p.204, Sniping NVA in My Tho;
p.258, ARVN generals as traitors;
p.288, Jumping 10 feet from helo;
p.311, Civilians killed or maimed because chemicals not allowed to chase them out of bunkers;
p.343, Administrators render SEALs ineffective;
p.345, Operations in North Vietnam;
p.373, Men abandoned;
p.388, Gulf war: Anti-infrared blankets; very long distance running on operations [see Native American literature].

Cornett, Alan G.,  GONE NATIVE, AN NCO'S STORY;  New York: Ballantine Books, 2000.   00-190522   0-8041-1637-7  Seven years in Vietnam.
p.136, Sgt. Lester "Superspade" Hite changes team location, saves them.
p.237-, "Capt. Le Xuan Phong... can read your mind!"  VERY interesting man!

Craig, William T,  LIFER!, From Infantry To Special Forces;  New York: Ivy Books, 1994.  U.S. Army from Korea to Vietnam.   94-94042   0-8041-0688-6    None noted.

Craig, William T.,  TEAM SERGEANT, A Special Forces NCO at Lang Vei and Beyond;  New York: Ivy Books, 1998.    97-93916   0-8041-1714-4    None noted.

Crawford, C.S.,  THE FOUR DEUCES, A Korean War Story;  New York: Pocket Books, 1990.  Marines.  0-671-70562-8 
Back cover: "...used his uncanny talent for judging distance to direct artillery..."
p.29, "...I knew almost instantaneously the distances involved...";
p.112, "...All I can say is that I can just look at it and right away I know what it [distance] is..." [Note: I know a man who can shoot ground levels, gradients, in his head, estimate cubic yardage to be removed or added, and compute quantity of paving materials needed.];
p.114, "...It's like you have invisible antennae, feeling... willing yourself to... it's sort of like a sixth sense or intuition...";
p.134-38, "...I got goose bumps... a premonition of bad luck..." "...I was breathing fast... almost hyperventilating... no physical exertion... scared... ears ringing... that ringing..." "...I knew that we had a death coming to us..."  [Moments later North Korean mortars killed two of his best friends, at least five others, wounded many more.];
p.262, "...He was the only ground commander that I ever had who took the time to tell his grunts why they had to do certain things..." ; Man killed by mine after "'...[Lt.] just got through tellin' us to watch where we walked...'";
p.267, Lt. said, "...We're going to have to pay for the last few easy weeks..." [Two days later he was killed.];
p.334, Men have strong feelings that enemy are slipping up for a night attack. Correct.

Culberstson, John J., 13 CENT Killers, The 5th Marine Snipers in Vietnam;  New York: Ballantine Books PRESIDIO, 2003.   0-345-45914-8  [There is enough information in this book for a good magazine article or two.]
p.16, Estimation of wind speed;
p.19, "...the Americans as they invaded...";
p.21, "...Viet Cong... at war since 1946... with the Japanese... (etc.)" [?];
p.53, VC elimination of intelligentsia;
p.101, "...all Marines fought for each other...";
p.123, Misuse of snipers;
p.126, M-14 replaced by M-16;
p.132, Proper use of snipers;
p.145, Chinese ammo uses steel cores rather than lead [? - was he referring to armor piercing ammo?];
p.146, Misuse of snipers;
p.147, Proper use of snipers;
p.158, Jungle noise as warning system;
p.163, "...pre-World War II conflicts against the Japanese..." [??];
p.190, Accurate 100 yard shooting with cal. .45 Colt 1911 model service pistol;
p.220, "...When the hairs on the backs of the point scouts' necks pricked up...".

Cutler, Lt. Cdr. Thomas J.,  BROWN WATER, BLACK BERET;  New York: Pocket Books, 1989 [US NAVAL INST, 1988].  U.S. Navy in rivers and canals of Vietnam.  0-671-67280-0   None noted.

Davis, Burke,  MARINE! The Life of Chesty Puller; New York: Bantam Books, 1964. (Little, Brown and Co. 1962; serialized in Marine Corps Gazette).
p.182, In his report of action on New Britain in Dec. '42 and Jan. '43, Puller said, "The newer 610 radio should be used for air-ground communication, since interference by active volcanoes interrupted less powerful radios."
p.353, Comments on discipline and Marines [See David Hackworth].
p.355, Re: "...someone is... keeping the truth from the American people..."

De Forest, Orrin, and David Chanoff,  SLOW BURN;  New York: Pocket Books, 1990.  The truth about America's intelligence failure in Vietnam.  0-671-73997-2   "...A fascinating story." -- Col. David H. Hackworth
p.172, De Forest told a pregnant young woman that she would bear twins--a rarity in Vietnam.  Five months later he was proved right.  [My personal experience suggests that this was not a coincidence, rather, intuition.]

Dockery, Kevin,  SEALS IN ACTION;  New York: Avon Books, 1991.  90-93556   0-380-75886-5 
p.16, 'Silence' - blocking reaction to horrendous din of battle;
p.125, Various technologies, electronics;
p.224, Navy scout and 'booby-trap' dogs;
p.293, SSG-574 Greyback , converted to swimmer delivery vehicle, etc (Portland, OR  OMSI ?);
p.296, USS Cavalla, sonar equipment, depth capability;
p.326, Training, team building.

Donahue, James C.,  MOBILE GUERRILLA FORCE, with the special forces in War Zone D;  New York: St. Martin's Press, 1996.  95-37395   0-312-96164-2   None noted.

Donahue, James C.,  BLACKJACK-33;  New York: Ivy Books, 1999.  Vietnam.  Mobile Guerrilla Force.  Index.  0-8041-1764-0   99-90451 
p.1, "...he paused every few steps while his brain sorted every shred of stimulus for possible danger...";
p.7, Failure of promised support; "'Many VC this area,' said Luc..." [correct.]
p.55-60, Very interesting description of marksmanship training for Cambodians;
p.61, Insect repellent mixed with lanolin;
p.143-, Cambodian politics;
p.145, TBQ-10 radar controlled Sky Spot night bombing system;
p.147, Misuse of units;
p.180,  20-ton VC rice cache, bags labeled 'Continental Grain Company, New York';
p.185, "...Except for a woodpecker tapping out what sounded like Morse code, everything was quiet..." [Or VC?]; booby trap;
p.187, High-carbon-content ammunition jams M-16s;
p.195, Men sense danger;
p.197, "...The enemy soldier looked up and sniffed the air. He sensed something... Our bodies and clothes stank."

Donahue, James C.,  BLACKJACK-34, with the Mobile Guerrilla Forces;  New York: Ballantine Books, 2000.  99-91746   0-8041-1765-9 
p.46-47, "...His senses were tuned to near perfection as his brain sorted every shred of stimuli for possible danger...  When on point, a soldier's primal instincts are electrified..."
p.49, sensitivity to smells; 'sixth sense';
p.62, 'sixth sense'; "...Whenever the enemy was near, the Bodes could sense their presence long before we made contact..."
p.155, "...I had the gut-feeling that Mister Charles was getting ready for an all-out attack on our side of the perimeter, and I wanted to be able to get back before he hit..."

Donahue, James C., NO GREATER LOVE. Original title of item above.

Donovan, David (pseudonym),  Once A Warrior King, Memories Of An Officer In Vietnam;  New York: Ballantine Books, 1985.  85-102   0-345-33316-0  
p.15, Poor tactics crossing river;
p.21, Starlight scope, 1969;
p.28, Anxiety, learning from experience; poor relations with civilians;
p.47, ³...Saigon [government] dosen¹t give a damn about [rural civilians]...²;
p.57, ³¹he¹s got to get his ticket punched...¹²;
p.65, ³...The captain had us on patrol every day and on ambush every night...² A good sergeant cracks under the stress;
p.67, Officer¹s poor judgement kills two men and two prisioners, destroys base;
p.103, Administrative difficulties, corruption threaten men¹s safety; men reduced to eating rats;
p.104, Culture shock, coping;
p.105, ³...Living with a price on your head... when awake, my eyes never stopped moving... The acuity of my peripheral vision became so great I could almost literally Œsee out of the back of my head.¹²
p.106-14, Paranoia; getting along with villagers, social differences;
p.122, Religious manipulation of villagers;
p.130, Positive views of Americans compared to Saigon government;
p.140, Sowing distrust in the enemy, CIA killings;
p.177, VC bomb school, kill maim children;
p.181, B-57 bombers confuse author;
p.250, Corruption;
p.315, ³...but I didn¹t like incompetence...²

Drury, Richard S.,  MY SECRET WAR;  New York: St. Martin's Press, 1986.  0-312-90503-3  Air war in Laos and Vietnam.  May include action where he instinctively changed pull-out, saved getting hit.

Ericson, Don, and John L. Rotundo,  CHARLIE RANGERS;  New York: Ivy Books, 1989.  Vietnam. Roster.  88-91240   0-8041-0288-0  
p.57, [D.E.] "...It always amazed me when we could actually smell the enemy...";
p.59, [D.E.] "...if someone saw something... It was as if all eyes, ears and noses were in sync with each other...";
p.85, [D.E.] One of ours had been killed.  "An eerie feeling crossed through my body and I somehow knew it was someone from (Team) 3-1, but I sat silently, not really knowing." [Correct];
p.103, [J.L.R.] Smoking a cigarette in the field. [Enemy could sometimes smell them from 1/4 mile away.];
p.112, [D.E.] Six helicopters delivering men for a stealth mission. [That's a lot of noise.];
p.121, [D.E.] Grass fire swept over their position--there was plenty of warning.  Rather than burying their explosives in the bottoms of their foxholes and starting backfires, they chose to blow the claymores and grenades, let fire sweep over them. Minor burns, mission thus compromised.;
p.130, [D.E.] "...Without a kill or a contact, a mission was just a walk in the woods. A walk in the woods made men lazy and very careless.";
p.135, [D.E.] Reaction force (to a contact with enemy) comes in; one soldier has boom-box to ear, listening to music, rifle slung from shoulder;
p.138, [J.L.R.] Men using camoflauge uniforms, skin paint, only to wear bright silver wings on hats;
p.145, [J.L.R.] Six men charge 80-100 enemy, who drop weapons and flee;
p.146, [J.L.R.] "...{Viet scout] acted as though he didn't want to go on the mission. [He and three others were then wounded.];
p.149, [J.L.R.] Ambushed walking through clearing;
p.180, [J.L.R.] Smoking a cigarette in the field.

Eschmann, Karl J.,  LINEBACKER, The Untold Story of the Air Raids Over North Vietnam;  New York: Ivy Books, 1989.   89-91317   0-8041-0374-7   None noted.

Estep, James L.,  COMANCHEE SIX, Company Commander in Vietnam;  New York: Dell Publishing, 1991.  0-440-21273-1   None noted.

Estes, Jack,  A FIELD OF INNOCENCE;  New York: Warner Books, 1987.  Vietnam, 1968.  None noted.

Ethell, Jeffery, and Alfred Price,  AIR WAR SOUTH ATLANTIC;  New York: Jove Books, 1986.  Falkland Islands, 1982.   0-515-08578-2   None noted.

Fane, Francis Douglas, and Don Moore,  NAKED WARRIORS;  New York: St. Martin's Press, 1956, 1995.  Navy UDT/SEALs   0-312-95985-0   None noted.

Fitz-Enz, Col. David G.,  WHY A SOLDIER?  A Signal Corpsman's Tour from Vietnam to the Moscow Hot Line;  New York: Ballantine Books, 2001.  Index.  0-8041-1938-4   00-107753 
p.23, "...'You [Americans] are very dangerous people; you say one thing and do another.'...";
p.24, Problems with M-16 rifle;
p.33, Watching movies in the evening, out in the field. [???];
p.45, General goes off half cocked;
p.48, Christmas time, American people send gifts to troops;
p.72, The negative bias of the journalists;
p.108, "The generals don't have a clue as to what the war was about.";
p.121, Army assigns color-blind man as cable splicer [wires are differentiated by color];
p.165, Awful description of use of 'dog tag' to identify body;
p.252, Communications problems caused by Alaska earthquake 1964;
p.259, Earthquake effects on houses in Japan;
p.274, Learning to pick people for jobs;
p.301-4, Supply cannot provide proper weapon for officer [Vietnam];
p.305, More problems getting weapons for combat;
p.308, Better system for selecting battalion commanders; Mentally, hearing the important information from several radios [Been there, done that.];
p.313, Soldier with high school diploma cannot read or write;
p.323, A seriously incompetent colonel;
p.390, 1970s, revolution in Army Command and General Staff College.

Flanagan, John F.,  VIETNAM ABOVE THE TREETOPS, A Forward Air Controller Reports;  New York: Dell Publishing, 1992.   0-440-21510-2   p. xiv, Mentions unconscious perceptions.  p. 226, "...positioning teams by feel and intuition..."

Foley, Dennis,  SPECIAL MEN, A LRP's Recollections;  New York: Ivy Books, 1994.   0-8041-0915-x   Introduction by David Hackworth.
p.vi, Hack re Foley: "...my sixth sense antenna told me that he was worth watching..."
p.207, Successful, Starlight scope.
p.209, Impractical technology, 'people sniffer', detects ammonia.
p.244, "Ward Just [of] the Washington Post... wrote some chilling stories..."

Foley, Dennis,  Long Range Patrol;  New York: Ivy Books, 1992.  NOVEL, Vietnam.  Recommended by Col. David Hackworth, USA (Ret.)  91-90634   0-8041-0707-6 
p.70, "'...I have a special sense.  I know when we are going to find a VC.  I can smell 'em and I can feel 'em moving in the bush,' Vinson said...";
p.106, "He had to rely on a seat-of-the-pants feeling he had for things he couldn't see.";
p.108, "Camancho made his decisions based on what he could see--and his instinct.";
p.288, "...Realizing that Hollister was looking at the back of his neck, Bernard quickly started...";
p.293-6, Detailed preparations for a mission;
p.382, Comments on the poison of revenge;
p.385, Troubles of dealing with Vietnamese corruption.

Ford, Gary Douglas,  4/4: A LRP'S NARRATIVE;  New York: Ivy Books, 1993.   92-97071   0-8041-0913-3   None noted.

Gadd, Charles,  LINE DOGGIE, Foot Soldier in Vietnam;  New York: Pocket Books, 1987.  101st Airborne.  0-671-66243-0   87-9216 
p.24, "pot head" goes berserk;
p.31, Men killed because damaged mortar ammo sent to troops instead of being destroyed;
p.32, When civilians disappear, enemy is near;
p.41, "...air was charged with the sensation of danger..." Hue, Tet, 1968;
p.50, Errant artillery hits building filled with families of ARVN troops;
p.60, VC mortars misidentified as 80mm;
p.86, Experienced Vietnamese scout, careless gun handling kills American;
p.139, "The sensation of danger hung in the air..." Enemy confirmed;
p.140, Lieutenant and his RTO walk blindly into enemy position, Lt. killed;
p.149, Sympathy for civilians dissipates in enemy controlled area;
p.150, Leeches;
p.151, Good leadership removes dumb order;
p.154, Forcing civilian into obvious booby trap--fatal;
p.155, "...we grew more and more careless..." [Exhaustion];
p.162, "'I'll go... but something tells me not to...' Now... he was dead...";
p.192, New officer kills man during weapons demo;
p.208, New 2nd Lt. demands salute from man with injured left arm in sling and right arm encumbered by multiple items;
p.211, "...ordered to move to center of paddy where there was no cover..." Enemy opened fire;
p.212, Scout dog... German shepherd... "meaner than a snake... dogs could sniff booby traps...";
p.213, Frustrations with civilians;
p.214, Man mistreats, murders civilian;
p.220, "...It was an accepted thing to cheat on a body count report...";
p.227, VC murder civilians to get compliance;
p.230, Author nearly murdered wounded prisoner.

Gantter, Raymond,  ROLL ME OVER, An Infantryman's World War II;  New York: Ivy Books, 1997.  Good reading.  96-94893   0-8041-1605-9 
p.55, Fitting in with average GIs is difficult for an educated man;
p.56, U.S. replacements trudging in 12-inch mud wearing 6-inch shoes;
p.63, Concealed U.S. troops suffer shelling, died, because general insisted on exposing himself on a ridge;
p.78, Idiotic officers cause unnecessary discomfort for cold troops;
p.101, Man, nerves shot, is a danger to the men around him; ignored by officers;
p.102, Fighting units were badly, dangerously, depleted while replacements were idle in the rear areas;
p.103, Troubles of finding shelter from weather;
p.141, Winter clothing issued in mid-January, when Battle of the Bulge is winding down;
p.167, Attacking through mine field;
p.323, Walked into well-prepared ambush at obvious location;
p.347, Children playing with hand grenade... pin worked loose...;
p.356, Dealing with a premonition of death;
p.360-, Last day of European war; opening gates to stalags;
p.382-, Senior officer abuses troops in formation.

Garner, Sgt. Mjr. Joe R., with Avrum M. Fine,  CODE NAME: COPPERHEAD;  New York: Pocket Books, 1994.   0-671-52931-5  Vietnam;  inside the Green Berets.
p.346, Upper echelons disregard troop's intuition w/ tragic results.
p.357, Seismic intrusion devices.

Gilbert, Adrian,  SNIPER;  New York: St. Martin's Press, 1994.  A history.  94-24922   0-312-95766-1  None noted.
p.206, Camouflage for face.
p.215, Optical aspects.
p.247, Ground radar, thermal imaging devices.

Goshen, Bill,  WAR PAINT;  New York: Ballantine Books, 2001.  LRP/Rangers, Vietnam.  Index.  0-345-44491-4
p.12, "...men [sent] into dangerous situations without all the equipment and support they needed...";
p.40, Suicidal assignment, men faked patrol;
p.47, Team integrity, compromised;
p.55, VC and NVA attacks on May 5, 1968;
p.65, Failure to properly credit activities;
p.67, Inappropriate assignments... charges of lying about results;
p.73, Suicidal orders from officers in the rear, survival by luck;
p.75, Suicidal orders from officers in the rear, troops ambushed;
p.82, Difficulties of patrolling in recently defoliated area; "...neither heard nor saw any sign of life, plant or animal..."; 
p.93, "...we were expendable...";
p.108, Attacked by helicopter, no injuries;
p.109, Caught at edge of Arc Light raid;
p.129, Improper assignment, caught by booby traps;
p.144, Change of unit designations;
p.157, "...he had a bad feeling about [the mission]..."; didn't go;
p.159, "...I had an eerie feeling... [about] pretty heavy combat..."; [Four died, two survived.];
p.173, Prayer chain, 'miraculous' improvement;
p.186, Officer ignores warning of attack;
p.194, Sick orders from commander in aircraft; threat of court martial for NOT abandoning wounded comrades.

Grant, W.T.,  WINGS OF THE EAGLE;  New York: Ivy Books, 1994.  93-94987  0-8041-1062-X   Helicopter pilot in Vietnam.
p.67, 'Booby-trap' trained dog saves handler;
p.94, Emotions on learning to fly;
p.205, Intuition prevents landing on booby-trapped helipad.

Greenberg, Martin H., and Agustus Richard Norton (Eds.),  TOURING NAM, The Vietnam War Reader; New York: Bantam Books, 1989 [William Morrow, 1985].   84-62022   None noted.

Gwin, Larry,  BAPTISM, A Vietnam Memoir;  New York: Ivy Books, 1999.  99-90659   0-8041-1922-8   Several references to headaches caused by dehydration.
p.265, "Yes, this was going to be a hot one. I could feel it."

Hackworth, Col. David H., and Julie Sherman,  ABOUT FACE, The Odessey of an American Warrior;  New York: Touchstone Press,  1989.  88-36235   0-671-69534-7 PBK
Intro by Ward Just:
p.16, "...combat veterans not desired.... as advisors..."; "He found the Army lying to itself..."
*****
p.25, "...he had an uncanny sixth sense;..."
p.41, "...he had eyes in the back of his head..."
p.73, "...when [a] gut feeling told me to [throw grenade],... (correct)";
p.74-5, Re a soldier's foreknowledge of death;
p.151-2, "...[he] whispered in my ear, 'I smell gooks.'"  (Correct.)
p.233, "...questions that started my sixth sense screaming..."
p.234, "...yet instinctively I knew each was a good man."
p.236, Comments on Army's mis-use of resources;
p.288, Comment on lack of inspiration in National Guard;
p.312, "...I lived and worked by gut feeling... [he] was a good man..."
p.343, Education, diploma mills;
p.363, Training for responsibility;
p.364, Col. Johns' shooting skill;
p.365, Paperwork overload;
p.376, Comment on John Birch Society;
p.400, "...something about him always made me uneasy..."
p.402, Col. Johns' basic philosophy on soldiering, listed;
p.465, Results of poor familiarization with locals;
p.487, Col. Hal Moore's sixth sense stopped enemy attack;
p.522, Astonishment at reckless order from Westmorland;
p.524, Comment on being too eager, motivated, for conditions;
p.539, Inappropriate use of troops, resources (And troops knew it.);
p.556, Inappropriate use of troops, resources;
p.590, Unqualified officers, poor training;
p.669, Anti-infiltrator radar;
p.756, Hack's attitude; being chewed out.

Hackworth, Col. David H.,  The Price of Honor;  New York: Berkley Books, 1999. NOVEL.  0-425-18064-6  
p.189-90, Intuitive reflex;
p.222, Intuition and observation;
p.312, Intuition, "She was in his head...";
p.334, Comments on Vietnam fiasco;
p.388, "'I got a very bad feeling about all of this.'";
p.496, "'Let's roll.'"

Hackworth, Col. David H., and Julie Sherman,  BRAVE MEN;  New York: Pocket Books, 1993.  Excerpts from ABOUT FACE; see above.  0-671-86560-9
p.52-53, Re fear.

Hamblen, First Sgt. Donald N., and Maj. Bruce H. Norton, (Ret.),  ONE TOUGH MARINE (Autobiography);  New York: Ivy Books, 1993.  Vietnam, Korea.  93-70006   0-8041-1031-X   None noted.

Hammel, Eric,  FIRE IN THE STREETS, The Battle for Hue, Tet 1968;  New York: Dell Publishing, 1991.  0-440-21174-3  None noted.

Hargrove, Thomas R.,  A Dragon Lives Forever;  New York: Ivy Books, 1994.
93-94986   0-8041-0672-x   Army officer/agronomist as adviser in Vietnam. Unusual story.
p.236, Comments on 'black' propaganda.
p.343, Info about rice.

Harrison, Marshall,  A LONELY KIND OF WAR, Forward Air Controller, Vietnam;  New York: Pocket Books, 1989.   0-671-70347-1
p.242, Comment on keeping secrets.

Hayes, Roger,  ON POINT, A Rifleman's Year in the Boonies: 1967-1968; New York: St. Martin's Paperbacks, 2001 [Presidio Press, 2000].  00-022895   0-312-98044-2
p.8, Philosophy of the platoon in traing;
p.44, "The rest of us, who had developed a sense for when the enemy wasn't around,..."
p.48, Civilian activity as a signal for danger;
p.2-75, Excellent discussion of the senses and woodcraft needed to be a point man;
p.01, Drunk or stoned men in combat?  "I would take the latter..."
p.146, Assault tactics that save our troops.

Herr, Michael,  DISPATCHES;  New York: Avon Books, 1968-77.  Vietnam  77-74994   0-380-01976-0   None noted.

Herrod, Randy,  Blue's Bastards;  New York: Dell Publishing, 1989.  In Vietnam Herrod saved Oliver North's life, then North came back to save him.  0-440-20822-X  
p.46, Man says he can smell beer, even in the can--and seems to prove it. [It is very hard to hide a case of beer in a Marine platoon--especially when you consider Reverse Speech and dowsing.]

Hodgkins, Michael C.,  RELUCTANT WARRIOR, A Marine's True Story of Duty and Heroism in Vietnam;  New York: Ivy Books, 1996.  97-93423   0-8041-1120-0
p.204, IOD, integrated observation device - for observing enemy - electronic.

Holley, M.D., Byron E.,  VIETNAM 1968-1969, A Battalion Surgeon's Journal;  New York: Ivy Books, 1993.  92-92758   0-8041-0934-6  Intro by Col. D. Hackworth.
p.99,  "...but for some unknown reason, I decided to wait... they got ambushed..."
p.138,  "The M-16 is notorius for for its propensity to jamb..."  antipersonnel radar.

Hopkins, William B.,  ONE BUGLE NO DRUMS;  New York: Avon Books, 1986.  Korea. Appendix, Bibliography.  Appendix.  Bibliography.  0-380-70455-2  86-3490 
p.55, 'Digging in' as a normal procedure;
p.73, November 2nd, expecting battle with Chinese troops;
p.75, Nov. 12th, prisoner says Chinese are there in large numbers;
p.86-7, More info on Chinese intervention;
p.92, N. Koreans indicate Chinese troops began entering on on Oct. 12th;
p.98, Negative aspects of bombing villages of neutral peasants;
p.105, Counting enemy casualties by number of friendly rounds fired;
p.110-11, News media has better intelligence than MacArthur's headquarters;
p.121, Chinese troop strengths, indicators;
p.122, MacArthur not impressed;
p.125, Nov. 28th, MacArthur's staff wakes up;
p.133, "...effective firepower means 'bullets hitting people.'";
p.150, "'Well, Cap'n Barrow's intuition is good enough for me...'";
p.153, "...He knew every man in his company, and the strength and weaknesses of each,...";
p.175, Disaster averted by snowstorm;
p.201, Marine and Navy planes change the tide of battle;
p.202, Apparent death premonitions, "'I don't know how they knew, but they knew...'";
p.206, Public opinion and use of atomic bomb;
p.210, Supply problems for Marines;
p.211, S.L.A. Marshall's appraisal of Marines;
p.229, Misuse of firepower in Vietnam, see item for page 98.

Hunter, Gaz,  The Shooting Gallery; London: Cassell Group, 1998.  0-575-06556-7  "The elite within the elite -- one man's secret wars" British SAS.
p.126, Afghaniston, Soviet cluster and fuel-air bombs;
p.193, Planning, and "...doing the job correctly..."

Hynes, Samuel,  FLIGHTS OF PASSAGE, Reflections of a WW II Aviator; New York: Pocket Books, 1989.  0-671-67410-2   None noted.

Jennings, Christian,  MOUTHFUL OF ROCKS, Modern Adventures in the French Foreign Legion;  New York: Pocket Books, 1989.   0-671-72801-6   None noted.

Johnson, Frank,  Diary of an Airborne Ranger, A LRRP's Year in the Combat Zone;  New York: Ballantine Books, 2001.  Vietnam.  00-109962   0-8041-1880-9  
p.72, "...two NVA with flashlights, trying to find our claymores...";
p.90, Not paying attention on patrol;
p.96, "..we all felt pretty uncomfortable, like something was going to happen..."  They backed off;
p.98, "...I smelled [VC]... [we] ran into enemy base camp, shot one...";
p.100, Shot peasant's water buffalo--no reason;
p.114, "...It's a sixth sense...";
p.120, 'Feeling' prevents injury;
p.129, "...I smelled [NVA] overnight.  I have a bad feeling...";
p.131-2, Still has bad feeling; enemy engaged;
p.140, ARVN scout says that "[author] see[s] things that others don't see..." Smelled enemy during the night;
p.147, Barking frog;
p.161, Death premonition, accurate;
p.185, New men not properly trained;
p.187, Removing qualified men;
p.193, "...[leaders] are really tearing us all down...";
p.198-9, Lieutenant fails to provide info for artillery support--could be fatal error;
p.207, Disillusionment;
p.231, "...don't play around with people's lives...";
p.232, Sixth sense.

Jorgenson, Kregg P.J.,  Very Crazy, G.I.;  New York: Ballantine Books, 2001.  Stange but true stories of the Vietnam war.  00-109141   0-8041-1598-2  
p.xvii, "...We've just accepted something without question until it has become part of our collective knowledge or lore....";
p.47, "...The trouble was, the old guy was hovering over the edge of the ridge, floating in midair.  It wasn't real.";
p.91, "...The jeep stopped to let him off, then just ten yards away, it hit a land mine.";
p.145, Premonition of of death.  He died just the way he said it would happen.

Jorgenson, Kregg P.J.,  THE GHOSTS OF THE HIGHLANDS, 1st Cav LRRPs in Vietnam, 1966-1967;  New York: Ivy Books, 1999.   98-93277   0-8041-1597-4
p.156-58,  'Instinct' correctly forecasts danger.

Jorgenson, Kregg P.J.,  LRRP COMPANY COMMAND, The Cav's LRP/Rangers in Vietnam, 1968-1969;  New York: Ballantine Books, 2000.  00-107752   0-8041-1920-1   None noted.

Jorgenson, Kregg P.J.,  MIA RESCUE, LRRPs in Cambodia;  New York: Ivy Books, 1995.  Vietnam.  95-95322   0-8041-0980-X
p.38, "If sixth sense mattered... but to do that would take more than just gut-level feelings...";
p.45, "...there was more than a nagging suspicion that something was wrong...";
p.65, "...the adrenaline began to surge through Senkowski's body, the unwitting response to a feeling in his gut...";
p.81, "...you fought for your buddies;...";
p.95, ..."'I read somewhere that between the eyes there's the ethmoid bone, which in some people is sensitive to the earth's magnetic core....";
p.140, "...fog... using an FM homer to land safely...";
p.190, Comments regarding the placebo effect.

Jorgenson, Kregg P.J.,  ACCEPTABLE LOSS, An Infantry Soldier's Perspective;  New York: Ivy Books, 1991.  Fifty-four [LRRP] missions as point man.  Vietnam   91-92122   0-8041-0792-0   None noted.

Kane, Rod,  VETERAN'S DAY, A Combat Odyssey;  New York: Pocket Books, 1990.  Vietnam   0-671-72523-8   None noted.

Katz, Samuel M.,  FIRE & STEEL, Isreal's 7th Armored Brigade;  New York: Pocket Books, 1996.  0-671-86764-4   None noted.

Kelly, Orr,  KING OF THE KILLING ZONE;  New York: Berkely Books, 1989.  The story of the M-1 Abrams tank.   0-425-012304-9   None noted.

Kelly, Orr,  FROM A DARK SKY, The Story of U.S. Air Force Special Operations;  New York: Pocket Books, 1997 [Presidio Press, 1996].   0-671-00917-6   None noted.

Kennedy, Michael Paul,  HE WHO DARES;  New York: Pocket Books, 1994 [Britain: Bloombury Publishing, 1989].  SAS, Counterterrorist forces.  0-671-79581-3   None noted.

Ketwig, John,  ...AND A HARD RAIN FELL;  New York: Pocket Books, 1985.  Vietnam.  0-671-68054-4   85-5653 
p.49-66, Terrifying convoy to a firebase under attack, and night under heavy fire;
p.73, Story of booby-trapped dogs;
p.100, Footnote regarding material by Ward S. Just;
p.160, "...I'm not the same, Mama; and I don't like the person I've had to become..." [Letter home];
p.176, Effects of terror;
p.216, "...Ego massage for the lifers had higher priority than critical parts that might save a man's life...";
p.253, Atomic bombs in Thailand [??].

King, Bob,  THE FINAL MISSION: SPOOKY 8;  New York: St. Martin's Paperbacks, 2002.  Vietnam, Cambodia, Columbia.  Very good reading.   0-312-97145-1
p.4, "...When it came to 'gut feeling'... It had to be unanimous.";
p.6, Remote viewers;
p.7, "...These radios used a special 'frequency-hopping' chip..."; Bone induction earphones;
p.19, Hi-tech surveillance equipment;
p.35, Counting paces [distance];Eyesight is secondary at night, tricks to avoid trip-wires;
p.38, Children and landmines;
p.44, Quiet jungle means danger;
p.45, Remote control of surveillance equipment;
p.48, Hi-tech surveillance equipment;
p.54, "...everything I sensed [was] processed at a tremendous rate..."; Ambushed;
p.62, Educated paranoia regarding booby-trapped equipment;
p.63, Normal jungle sounds are comforting;
p.88, Vibes regarding bad mission;
p.92-3, Hiding top-secret information as "insurance";
p.127, "...For some reason I had an intense dislike for these men..." [They were drug runners.];
p.142, National Reconnaissance Office, distrust; "...the world is... wired..."
p.143, Sensing danger at a new location, dogs too quiet [It was safe.];
p.148, Dealing with stress and loss of friends;
p.173, Government remote viewing program alive and well;
p.193-4, Sensing danger.

Kirschke, James J.,  Not Going Home Alone, A Marine's Story;  New York: Ballantine Books, 2001.  Vietnam.  Index.  0-345-44093-5  
p.29, Using training to avoid morale problems;
p.37, Inadequate training in landmines and booby traps;
p.49, Misleading intelligence briefing regarding landmines and booby traps;
p.65, Innate competence leads to destruction of enemy mortars;
p.66, Premonition of disaster prevents casualties from friendly fire;
p.76, Beware when villagers disappear;
p.85, Deja vu;
p.97, ³...I had the distinct feeling that [he] was a man who was worth something...²; Incompetent sergeant ³...[was] to cost us dearly...²
p.99-100, Unneeded chopper traffic alerts enemy; CP set up in highly visible location;
p.101, Bombed by friendly aircraft;
p.116, Company moved using wrong formation, ambushed;
p.123, Unit badly understrength;
p.133, ³...awoke feeling that we were headed for action of some kind...²;
p.143, Unit badly understrength, 33 percent of authorized;
p.158, ³...Acting on a hunch...² prevented casualties;
p.213, ³...my senses were keener than...²;
p.223, Rain causes stream to rise, men die unnecessarily;
p.227-35, Landmines and booby traps, etc.; man intuitively finds large landmine in LZ just before choppers arrive;
p.244, ³...I sensed something sinister...² --no problems that day;
p.247, ³...On that morning I felt a special sense of alarm for three reasons...² He lost his legs to the landmines;
p.251, Three devices had been wired together.

Knappe, Siegfried, with Ted Brusaw,  SOLDAT, Reflections of a German Soldier, 1936-1949;  New York: Dell Books, 1992.  World War II; Index, maps inadequate.
p.54, "...We could usually detect from the sound what kinds of weapons were being fired... the direction the shell was coming from... whether it would pass over our heads or...";
p.97, Excitement of propaganda demonstrations;
p.104, Abuse in training;
p.118, Thorough officer training;
p.119, Importance of tactics;
p.138, Crystal Night not spontaneous;
p.175, "'My hunch is that [French] know tomorrow is the date for our attack...'";
p.207, In Russia: "...[German] forward scouts were rarely killed...";
p.221, Dead comrade's voices... [heard in battle];
p.276-, Anzio: "...no [German] troops were readily available to oppose [the Allies]...";
p.339, "might-makes-right";
p.384, Communist idealism.

Krulak, Lt. Gen. Victor H.,  FIRST TO FIGHT;  New York: Pocket Books, 1991 [US NAVAL INST, 1984].  An inside view of the U.S. Marine Corps.  0-671-73012-6   None noted.

Kugler, Ed,  DEAD CENTER, A Marine Sniper's two-year Odessy in the Vietnam War;  New York: Ivy Books, 1999.  99-90065   0-8041-1875-2 
p.327, "...I could almost taste trouble, I could feel it deep inside!"  [He was right.]

LaBarge, William H., Lt.Cmdr. USN,  Desert Voices, Personal Testimony from Gulf War Heroes;  New York: Harper Paperback, 1991.   0-06-100354-9
p.250-1, Marines began infiltrating 48 hours before main ground attacks began.

Lanning, Michael Lee,  INSIDE THE CROSSHAIRS, Snipers in Vietnam;  New York: Ivy Books, 1998.   98-92560   0-8041-1620-2
p.18, Accuracy of bows and arrows;
p.113, Qualifications for snipers, must be right handed because of the design of bolt action rifles;
p.175, Excellent trained sniper killed when used as infantryman, which he should have been supporting.

Lanning, Michael Lee, and Ray William Stubbe,  INSIDE FORCE RECON, Recon Marines in Vietnam;  New York: Ivy Books, 1989.   89-91134   0-8041-0301-1
p.88, "They got so they could hear things that others could not.  They could pick up smells.  It got to be like a sixth sense," said 1st Lt Russell L. Johnson;
p.93, Team sign language;
p.184, Sergeant killed, listed as MIA.

Lee, Lt.Col. Alex,  UTTER'S BATTALION, 2/7 Marines in Vietnam, 1965-66;  New York:  Ballantine Books, 2000.  99-91633     0-8041-1638-5   None noted.

Lee, Lt.Col. Alex,  FORCE RECON COMMAND, 3rd Force Recon Company in Vietnam,1969-70;  New York: Ballantine Books, 1996.  96-94466   0-8041-1023-9   None noted.

Leninger, Jack,  TIME HEALS NO WOUNDS;  New York: Ivy Books, 1993.  93-90208   0-8041-0916-8
p.91, Artillery fired at UFO on ground;
p.101, Artillery's radar detected UFOs;
p.112, Conversation re fragging an officer;
p.217, Enhanced perception in combat.

Leppelman, John,  BLOOD ON THE RISERS, An Airborne Soldier's Thirty-five Months in Vietnam;  New York: Ivy Books, 1991.  91-91829   0-8041-0562-6 
p.6, "...harassment... to make the weak quit...";
p.21, Issued M-16 in very poor shape;
p.46, "...my sixth sense was already developing...";
p.53, "...I was almost sleep walking in the intense heat..." [Not a good idea.];
p.54, "...Laying about eighteen inches from my body was a bamboo viper... coiled..."  It had been on another man's shoulder, staring "eye-to-eye..."; M-16 jammed in combat after six shots;
p.56, Questioning why M-16 was used under jungle conditions;
p.60, Sleeping... "Something was wrong.  I opened my eyes but didn't move..." Five feet away, in the water, a boa constrictor was staring at him;
p.66, "...of the sixteen men who were dead, nine had M-16s that were jammed..." ;
p.68, They had been sucked into a trap by a decoy. [Above];
p.70, Man killed when playing hot potato with a grenade;
p.71, Test firing... "My rifle would jamb after six to ten rounds..."  Others were having trouble with their M-16s;
p.73, Jungle silent, men moving noisily, shouting to each other. Dangerous;
p.86, Seven men killed and thirty wounded by friendly fire, see p.96;
p.89, Likely enemy ahead, moved into open area, hit by enemy fire, a trap;
p.98, Caught in crossfire, enemy in front, helo door gunners behind;
p.99, Infrared nightscope (April 1967);
p.101, "...This war was being fought badly...";
p.122, "'...I've got a bad feeling about Charlie company's future...'";
p.124, Major harasses troops just in from jungle;
p.133, Dangerous effects of fatigue;
p.134, Starlite scope, May '67;
p.134-5, 3:00 A.M., brilliant UFO rises from jungle below ridge bivouac, disappears into sky; the UFO apparently panicked enemy on opposite ridge, they fled leaving gear behind;
p.136, Helmet struck by fragment from friendly fire;
p.146, Battlefield paranoia;
p.176, Body count fabrications; "My sixth sense told me that if we stayed in Dak To, we weren't going to make it..."
p.181, Some troops refuse combat;
p.185, Medical care refused for sick troops--manpower shortage;
p.209-11, Company hit very hard at Dak To;
p.230, Tet, NVA executes civilians;
p.231, Observations on Tet, ARVN, corruption;
p.237, "I... had a bad feeling about the boat..." [Bad situation.];
p.273, Improvements to M-16;
p.280-1, Ordered to sight in his rifle [Good!]; Preparations for recon patrol; No cigarettes on patrol;
p.285, Smell, and toilet habits on patrol; Physical toll of stress on patrol.

Linderer, Gary A.,  THE EYES OF THE EAGLE, F Company LRPs in Vietnam, 1968;  New York: Ivy Books, 1991.  90-93584   0-8041-0733-5
p.160/61,  Mr. Grant, helo pilot, avoids booby-trap.

Linderer, Gary A.,  SIX SILENT MEN, 101st LRP/Rangers, Book Three;  New York: Ivy Books, 1997.  Vietnam.  97-93362   0-8041-1567-2 
p.25-8, "...The hair on the back of my neck was beginning to stand at attention..."; team leader's call for extraction denied; "...[the new men] sensed our anxiety..."; changed location after dark, observed light at old location;
p.35, "...something was wrong. I could feel it..." [rappelling into new enemy fortifications, other helo misses location];
p.39, "...I awoke with a start... heavy fog... saw something out of corner of my eye..." [3 NVA among sleeping Americans];
p.52, "...at 0130 hours in the morning everything suddenly grew quiet. It was as if the frogs and crickets had just gotten the word to stop chirping on cue... two or three minutes later... [activity resumed]" [This type of silence often indicates hostiles nearby.  In this case, it could have been subliminal geological signals.];
p.57-, Attack on Firebase Jack: "misuse" of Lurps pays off [for once];
p.63, Seeing commo wire in grass on dark night;
p.67, "...sensed that something was about to happen...";
p.71, Sudden quiet gives warning of imminent assault;
p.92-, The Premonition:  Nightmare eerily predicts incident which occurs a month later;
p.104, Radio transmission attracts lightning, disaster;
p.112, New Starlight scope model, 1969;
p.114, "Sensing danger..." [found recent enemy activity];
p.128, Mother knew something was wrong as son returned to Vietnam, he was killed;
p.139, "...something told [him] to check it out..." [found cache of enemy rockets];
p.168, "...something was wrong... the mission didn't feel right...";
p.171-, Vietnamese scout suddenly reports many NVA in area; both radios go dead at same time; 6 hours later, one of the works again; "...air around patrol suddenly seemed to grow heavy..." [They are surrounded.];
p.190, "...[he] got a weird feeling and held back...";
p.208, Teams out without adequate support;
p.223, Six man team killed while sleeping;
p.226, New men sent into high-risk areas;
p.228-9, Radio commo problems;
p.235, Man had premonition of death [accurate];
p.237-, Wiretap mission;
p.243, "...security had gotten a little lax... Rangers had given in to the temptation to light up cigarettes--a no-no on any long range patrol." [They were hit.] ;
p.261, "[He] had an uncanny ability to sense when the team was being followed...";
p.281-5, Team ambushed when ordered to retrieve "battle-trophies" for a colonel; 
p.288, Inappropriate mission, ambushed;
p.318, "...immediately sensed that something wasn't right.  He couldn't tell what was causing the hair on the back of his neck to stand up... Alarm bells began going of in [his] head..."  Moments later, the unseen enemy opened fire.;
p.320, "...The survivors attributed their survival to good luck, intuition, or divine intervention."; "...most of them left any vestiges of a sixth sense in the trash barrel...";
p.321, "...they smelled... the strong odor of Vietnamese soldiers...";
p.325, "Everything was abnormally quiet... Ambush!";
p.328, Officers get medals, enlisted men are bypassed;
p.331, "...they felt as if they were being watched..."  Enemy rockets landed around them just before midnight.

Linderer, Gary A.,  PHANTOM WARRIORS, LRRPs, LRPs and Rangers in Vietnam, Book Two;  New York: Ballantine Books, 2001.  00-109371   0-8041-11940-6
p.95, "Suddenly the Ranger team leader realized that the NVA were herding them..."
p.117, "...for some reason the northern end of the wood line appealed to the LRP team leader..."
p.192, "He was one of those fortunate people who possessed excellent night vision, and he seemed to have a special sense for nearby danger..."
p.206, "...shared their thoughts during the night, both men expressing bad feelings about the coming day..."
p.234, "...the patrol detected the distinct aroma of Viet Cong and went on the alert."
p.241, "They could sense they were getting close to something.  The hair on the back of everyone's neck was standing straight up."
p.271, "Neither man could put his finger on the source of his anxiety, but their well-developed sixth senses were setting off alarm bells."

Maguire, Steve,  JUNGLE IN BLACK;  New York: Bantam Books, 1992;  0-553-29486-5  Recon platoon leader blinded in combat.  None noted.

Manchester, William,  GOODBYE, DARKNESS, A Memoir of the Pacific War;  New York: Dell Books, 1987 [Little, Brown, 1979-80].  0440-32907-8
p.87..., Combat hallucinations and delusions;
p.113, Papuans (New Guinea) "born with sixth sense'' for jungle life;
p.132, Abandoned P-38s and B-24s;
p.237/38, NCOs - intuition for knowing their men, danger;
p.272, Tarawa, and the instincts of the riflemen;
p.291, Manchester's personal combat nightmares;
p.451, The men fight for one another. 

Mangold, Tom, and John Penycate,  THE TUNNELS OF CU CHI;  New York: Berkely Books, 1988.  Vietnam   0-425-08951-7   None noted.

Marcinko, CMDR (Ret.), Richard,  ROGUE WARRIOR, circa 1991, notes not presently available.

Marcinko, CMDR (Ret.), Richard, and John Weisman,  ROGUE WARRIOR II: RED CELL (Novel based on real events);  New York: Pocket Books, 1994.  0-671-79957-6  
p.81, "VELA satellites are targeted at nuclear facilities." [This could be part of our nuclear materials detection system. See McKinnon, Dan.]
p.190, "...instinct... like the time in Vietnam when a voice in my head said 'Duck!' and I threw myself onto the ground just as an AK-47 blasted at me from five yards away...";
p.223-4, poor security at U.S. Navy nuclear weapons storage depot;
p.286, poor airport security;
p.293, sophisticated sensors at some airports.

Marcinko, Richard,  THE REAL TEAM, SEALs in Vietnam;  New York: Pocket Books, 1999.  0-671-02465-5  Describes the make-up of succesful fighting men; personal stories of such men.
p.22, 'A creative leader listens to intuition;'
p.133, "men fight for one another;"
p.134, "People... know when they are being lied to."  'Things work best when problems are faced.'
p.145, "In combat, Harry and I communicated without uttering a word or wasting time with hand signals; we were that much in sync."

Marcinko, Richard, Cmdr., and James D. "Patches" Watson, III,  Hunters and Shooters, An Oral History of the U.S. Navy SEALs in Vietnam, edited by Bill Fawcett;  New York: Avon Books, 1995.  Index.  94-42764   0-380-72166-X  
p.26-8, Dolphins used at Cam Ranh bay;
p.59-60, Sealions used.

Marshall, S.L.A.,  AMBUSH;  New York: Jove Books, 1988 [Battery Press, 1983].
'A blistering account of Vietnam's battle of Dau Tieng.'  0-515-09543-5   None noted.

Marshall, S.L.A.,  WEST TO CAMBODIA;  New York: Jove Books, 1986 [Battery Press, 1984].  Vietnam jungle war.   0-515-08890-0   None noted.

Marshall, S.L.A.,  The Battle for BIRD;  New York: Warner Books, 1968.  Vietnam.  0-515-35314-0 
p.21, Defenses nearly nonexistent;
p.26, "'...something big is bound to happen...'";
p.27, "...a mutual feeling of edginess...";
p.78, M-16 jammed;
p.79, Many green soldiers together; M-16 jammed; M-60 and 4 M-16s jammed;
p.131, "...the smell of danger.";
p.132, Out for an ambush with only one round for his M-79 grenade launcher;
p.133, Lured into a trap;
p.146, "...Some instinct told him that the enemy must be present in large numbers..." [True];
p.164, M-16 jammed.

Martinez, Reynel,  SIX SILENT MEN, 101st LRP/Rangers, Book One;  New York: Ivy Books, 1997.  Vietnam.  Strong candidate for Top Ten Vietnam era books.  96-94868   0-8041-1566-4
p.8, Starlight scope, 1965;
p.15, Delta Force performing long range patrols, 1964;
p.23, "All the senses became three or four times keener...";
p.36, Face to face with an enemy, at three feet... observes startle reaction... no shots fired...;
p.42, S.Sgt. Robert Doty nearly walks into VC classroom session; beginning of "Beware of Lurps" classroom legend?
p.132, "'I had a funny feeling about the mission...'" found himself and one other man in the middle of an occupied VC base camp, acting like they were a company;
p.142, Problems with a scout dog;
p.170, Caught flat-footed;
p.186, REMFs extortion of money from troops;
p.220, "REMFs could sense us when we came into a place...";
p.244, "'...I had an uneasy feeling...'" stumbled onto a trail, VC soon appeared;
p.246, VC unknowingly stepped on Lurp's finger;
p.254, "...started to have strange feelings about this mission..." hit by enemy at night;
p.268, S.Sgt. Lester 'Superspade' Hite and others 'feel' danger, evacuate night position before it is struck by VC;
p.281, Lurp receives 13 Purple hearts--last one posthumously;
p.293, Mother knows when son dies in combat;
p.294, Amazing letter from the dead soldier's sister;
p.305, Man disobeys order, saves Claymore mine, saves the day with it later;
p.319, Three men act intuitively to overwhelm enemy;
p.322, "But then my sixth sense kicked into gear...";
p.334, "The hair on the back of my neck was standing up..." beginning of Tet, 1968.

Marvicson, Dennis J., and Jerold A. Greenfield,  MAVERICK;  New York: Jove Books, 1990.  Helicopters. Vietnam.  Enjoyable.  0-515-10662-3
p.4, Note to authors: Modern cannons fire shells, not bullets;
p.12, Description of a remarkable man;
p.19, Psyching out pilot trainee with 'hover switch';
p.45, Dismay at children fighting war;
p.81, Disregard for hands-on intelligence leads to fiasco; Effects of stress;
p.117, Father Wah hosting VC meeting;
p.130, Allusion to sixth sense;
p.206, Bullets snapping by described as 'little bees' [Was he really there?]; Poor security, reaction to attack on base;
p.280, Man who ran SOLO LRRP missions of 30 to 40 days.

Mason, Robert,  CHICKENHAWK,  New York: Penguin Books, 1984 (Viking Press, 1983).  A helicopter pilot in Vietnam  84-440   0-1400-7218-7
p.130, French landmines (1954) kill Americans in 1965;
p.140, Anti-helicopter boobytrap, comment on alertness;
p.143, Hatred of mosquitoes kept them away, until he went to sleep;
p.150, Gear badly needed by troops ends up in rear areas;
p.189, Hysteric deafness (temporary) under fire;
p.228, Vietnamese kid said he knew when Mason was coming to town;
p.419, Peripheral vision and low-level night flying.

McDonough, James R.,  PLATOON LEADER;  New York: Bantam Books, 1986 [Presidio Press, 1985].   0-553-25462-6   Vietnam   None noted.

McGlone, Randall K.,  GUTS & GLORY;  New York: Pocket Books, 1992.  Marines.  Vietnam.  0-671-76062-9 
p.2-, "...a nagging feeling told me that something was amiss..."; military age men in village (unusual); on return through village, ambushed, many Marines die;
p.8, Heightened senses in combat;
p.32, Problems with M-16 rifles;
p.57, Heightened senses in combat;
p.60, I suspected a great number of NVA forces in the neighborhood, and I knew we would find them..." [Correct];
p.77, 'Sleeping' while walking [Dangerous behavior];
p.78, Evacuation of very seriously wounded only;
p.87, Very troublesome enemy soldier killed by blindly thrown grenade, "...What a miracle!...";
p.108, On the line, very sick, "...I knew that tomorrow I would die." [Wrong];
p.109, Misuse of trained men;
p.116, Nearly every man in a platoon killed, surviving sergeant in shock, found covered by bodies of his men;
p.125, NVA found with large quantities of medical supplies from USA;
p.133, "...but they are still there. I can feel it.";
p.147, "I had a bad feeling, a premonition... 'A voice kept saying 'Where the hell are the NVA?''" [Found out, the hard way.].

McKinnon, Dan,  Bullseye IRAQ;  New York: Berkely Books, 1988 [House of Hits, 1987].  0-425-11259-4   Israel' attack on Saddam's nuclear bomb plant.  Forward by Randy "Duke" Cunningham.
p.22, Two Israeli pilots intuit Egyptian surprise attack at beginning of 1973 Yom Kippur War, take off seconds before bombs hit, shoot down 7 of 12 attackers.
p.54-55, U.S. instruments detect Soviet nuclear weapons being shipped to Egypt, during 1967 Six-Day War.
p.130, Comments on leadership by Randy Cunningham, U.S. Navy Vietnam War Ace.  [ In movie 'Top Gun', the air battles of 'Maverick' and 'Goose' are taken from the experience of Randy Cunningham and his R.O., Willie Driscoll.  See Aces of the Air and Naval Air War over Vietnam.]

McMaster, Capt. H.R., in the video, INSIDE THE KILL BOX: Fighting the Gulf War, on The Discovery Channel: "I had a gut feeling, along with the intelligence, that we were about to engage..." regarding the battle at '73 Easting', Iraq. (Troop E, U.S. 2nd Armored Cavalry Regiment)

McNab, Andy,  BRAVO TWO ZERO;  New York: Island Books (Dell Publishing), 1993.  British SAS behind the lines, Iraq.  0-440-21880-2
p.103-4, Serious error, staring at boy goatherder; see Jim Morris, WAR STORY;
p.215, Heightened perception.

McNab, Andy,  IMMEDIATE ACTION;  New York: Dell Publishing, 1995.  British SAS around the world.  0-440-22245-1   None noted.

Meacham, William C.,  LEST WE FORGET: The Kingsmen, 101st Aviation Battalion, 1968;  New York: Ivy Books, 1999.  Helicopters.  Vietnam.  0-8041-1917-1   99-90740 
p.65, At beginning of Tet attacks, instinct guides pilot to spot between two bunkers; he stops VC penetration;
p.92, Flying helicopters down a road, in a line, inside a tunnel of trees, at night, without lights, no moon, "...It was crazy!...";
p.94, Dismay at failure to be informed of facts before going on mission above;
p.151, U.S. sniper, 2ndLt. Mike Clark kills NVA general;
p.242, Meacham avoids booby-trapped helo pad, "...something didn't look right...";
p.248, "...I can feel the son of a bitch watching me...";
p.271, "...no one [on the teams] seemed to feel good about the [mission] coming up..."  [Disaster on Nov. 20, 1968].

Mertel, Col. Kenneth D.,  YEAR OF THE HORSE--VIETNAM;  New York: Bantam Books, 1990 [Exposition Press, 1968].  Helicopter warfare.  0-553-28307-3   None noted.

Miller, Franklin D., with Elwood J.C. Kureth,  REFLECTIONS OF A WARRIOR;  New York: Pocket Books, 1991.  Green Beret Medal of Honor Winner's 6 Years in Vietnam.   0-671-75396-7   None noted.

Miller, John Grider,  THE BRIDGE AT DONG HA;  New York: Dell Publishing, 1990.   0-440-20578-6   None noted.

Miller, Kenn,  SIX SILENT MEN, 101st LRP/Rangers, Book Two;  New York: Ivy Books, 1997.  Vietnam.  96-95197   0-8041-1564-8 
p.20, Unreal emphasis on body count;
p.35, Modified equipment and rations;
p.44-5, Failure to follow up on Tet successes;
p.46, Harassment of troops; failure to support LRRPs;
p.52, "...had a feeling that they were being watched...";
p.56, Intelligence flows mostly up, withheld from many units;
p.57, Misuse of trained men;
p.75, Failure to follow up on Tet successes;
p.81, "...eating... sensed a presence... feeling that someone was watching... black leopard stepped around man next to [him]...";
p.96, Doc Norton impaled by water buffalo;
p.101, "...At night, hearing was the dominant sense,...";
p.124, Misuse of Lurps;
p.139, Inserted at wrong location;
p.151, "...sometimes a sixth or seventh sense alerts people when they are being watched... one of the NVA soldiers raised his rifle and began to sweep his eyes..."
p.170, Captain harasses men, loses foot to booby trap in tent;
p.177, Team leader, Sgt., fails to follow SOP [See Nov. 20];
p.182, David Hackworth mentioned;
p.196, Macho man eats toad, poison skin fatal;
p.206, Bill Meacham, booby-trapped chopper pad, sixth sense;
p.207, "...feeling that they were being watched..." heard mortars being fired at them...;
p.223, "...Sergeant... always had his own ideas about..." [See Nov. 20, 1968];
p.226-7, "...he'd had his fill of [sergeant]..." [etc.];
p.237-, Nov. 20, 1968: Sergeant... fails to follow SOPs, team trapped, he and three others killed, seven wounded;
p.244, NVA brings up 40 pound mine;
p.283, Chapter on Lessons Learned;
p.287, Radios would not work under some conditions--dead zones.

Miller, Jr., Rad,  Whattaya Mean I Can't Kill 'Em?  One SEAL's War in IV Corps,1969;  New York: Ivy Books, 1998.  98-93233    0-8041-1766-7
p.179-80, Re: Sixth sense for knowing if VC is there.
p.215-17, Electronic listening devices, booby-traps for helicopters.

Moore, Lt. Gen. Harold G., and Joseph L. Galloway,  WE WERE SOLDIERS ONCE... AND YOUNG;  New York: HarperTorch, 2002 [Random House, 1992].   0-06-050698-9.  Reflects much of the wisdom of David Hackworth. Maps are located with pictures.
p.33, Comment re a sergeant's knowing his men;
p.35, Listening to a FAC in Vietnam while on wargames in So. Carolina;
p.77, "I want you two to be especially careful on this operation... Don't let your companies get separated."
p.81, "I had a strong sense that we were under direct enemy observation..." correct;
p.88, Premonition of death, correct;
p.303, Confusion of battalion comander - two items;
p.441, Comments re training vs. tour of duty.

Moriarty, J.M.,  GROUND ATTACK VIETNAM: The Marines Who Controlled the Skies;  New York: Ivy Books, 1991.  91-91829    0-8041-0562-6
p.113, "...Color blind people aren't confused by camouflage..."
p.153, Re: Use of a gas to knock people out.
p.196, Incident regarding how being relaxed, or even smart-assed, can bring amazing results.  (I had at least one such personal experience. RWF)

Morris, Jim,  WAR STORY;  New York: Dell Publishing, 1985 [Paladin Enterprises, Inc., 1979].  A Green Beret in Vietnam.   0-440-19362-1  
p.75, "...the sudden knowledge that the ambush would go..."
p.79, "all intelligence flowed up... none flowed down..."
p.159, "...my socks rolled up in my boots..."
p.162, Re effective lanolin-based leech repellent;
p.199, "...and set my subconscious to jump at the slightest sound."
p.229, "And I discovered there was something to ESP after all..." staring at someone's back; see Andy McNab, BRAVO TWO ZERO;
p.271, "The ARVN found itself during Tet [1968]." plus other interesting related comments;
p.301, Carlos Casteneda, warrior disciplines.

Morris, Jim,  FIGHTING MEN;  New York: Dell Publishing, 1993.  0-440-21150-6.  Interesting stories of Vietnam combat.
p.28, Re: effective techniques for shooting the enemy;
p.100, 'Dead' man took two fatal bullets, one thru the heart.  He then sat up and shot enemy soldier who was aiming at helo pilot. 'It is highly likely that both of his wounds were from the same burst. He died in helicopter.' [I disagree. Heart shot probably occured when he sat up to shoot enemy. Text describes hot, chaotic landing zone, choppers hit many times.  Indeed, description being quoted in text is unclear. BF]
p.102-3, misuse of recon teams in house-to-house fighting;
p.206, loss of auditory memory;
p.215, "'...the hair on the back of me (sic) neck stood up, which has saved me more than once...'"

Murphy, Edward F.,  DAK TO, America's Sky Soldiers in S. Vietnam's Central Highlands;  New York: Pocket Books, 1993.   0-671-52268-X   None noted.

Nicholson, Thom,  15 MONTHS IN SOG, A WARRIOR'S TOUR;  New York: Ivy Books, 1999.  Vietnam Special Operations.   0-8041-1872-8   None noted.

Nolan, Keith William,  BATTLE FOR HUE, TET 1968;  New York: Dell Publishing, 1985 [Presidio Press, 1983.   0-440-10407-6   None noted.

Nolan, Keith William,  THE MAGNIFICENT BASTARDS, The Joint Army-Marine Defense of Dong Ha, 1968;  New York: Dell Publishing, 1994.  0-440-22162-5   None noted.

Nolan, Keith William,  SAPPERS IN THE WIRE, The Life and Death of Firebase Mary Ann;  New York: Pocket Books, 1995.  Vietnam.  Index.  0-671-00254-6 
p.4, Training for reaction marksmanship; Mascot dog reacts violently towards perimeter, nothing seen, disregarded;
p.5, Officers relaxing... in a house made of glass...;
p.17, Bunker protection technique... rocks on roof;
p.23, Staff procrastination hurts defenses;
p.24, Get lost... get hit by friendly fire;
p.29, Comfort rather than protection...;
p.33, Dirty M-16 blows up;
p.40-41, Blatant inattention to defense;
p.43, ARVN refuse permission to fire on hostiles;
p.52, Poor security;
p.78, Misidentification of source of hostile fire;
p.94, Inexperienced officer;
p.97, "...[sergeant] had an uncanny sense of direction...";
p.105, Artillary officer had not checked the terrain on map;
p.106, Sergeant killed when following inept lieutenant's orders;
p.116, "'We're going to walk into an ambush real soon...'" [Correct];
p.121, Dog alerted to enemy, but missed ambush claymore;
p.131, "...The NVA were there--everyone could feel it..." [Correct];
p.143, "Something was going to happen. He could feel it..." [Night before disaster.];
p.144, "...He frequently found guards asleep when walking the bunker line...";
p.151, Calls to three bunkers out of twenty-two would be answered;
p.182, "...Most slept through their guard duty.";
p.188, "'He told me of this premonition the very night we were overrun...'";
p.194, "'...We had no idea of what was coming... it sure looked like [the ARVNs] did.'";
p.258, Complacency;
p.260, Hamburger Hill and FSB Airborne experience.

Norman, Michael,  These Good Men;  New York: Pocket Books, 1989.  Marine Vietnam veterans.  Index.   0-671-73173-4
p.30, "It has been written that men like Belknap, men who have been savaged, have lost the capacity to feel.  That is wrong.  They feel too much.";
p.42, "The enemy was near; he could feel it....";
p.75, "...They fight to survive; they fight for their comrades....";
p.187-8, Comments on S.Sgt Matthew McKeon and Ribbon creek (1956).

Norton, Maj. Bruce H.,  FORCE RECON DIARY, 1969;  New York: Ivy Books, 1991.  91-91828   0-8041-0671-1   U.S. Marines.  None Noted.

Norton, Maj. Bruce H. (Ed.),  STINGRAY;  New York: Ballantine Books, 2000.  Marine Recon, Vietnam.  00-105083   0-8041-1026-3
p.54, Silenced sniper's rifle;
p.66-70, Battle at Ba To;
p.118, Battle at Ba To;
p.143, Comment re insertions, enemy not stupid.

Norton, Maj. Bruce H., and M.Gy.Sgt. Len Maffioli,  GROWN GRAY IN WAR, The Len Maffioli Story;  New York: Ivy Books, 1997.  96-95499   0-8041-1599-0  None noted.

Norton, Maj. Bruce H., and Sgt.Maj. Maurice J. Jacques,  SERGEANT MAJOR, U.S. MARINES (Biography);  New York: Ivy Books, 1995.   0-8041-1030-1
p.58-9, Chesty Puller, re deficiencies in stored weapons;
p.72, Use of explosives;
p.237, "The hair on the back of my neck began to bristle..." before enemy opened fire;
p.249, Ba To battle, hard lessons;
p.284, Creative use of rifle grenades;
p.329, No expanation for why a man in country 14 days, with company 4 days, was walking point when ambushed.  Normal patrol cycle would indicate this was his first patrol.
p.458, Col. Baker: "We could feel that the NVA were down there..." (Ba To battle.)

O'Brien, Tim,  IF I DIE IN A COMBAT ZONE, Box Me Up and Ship Me Home;  New York: Dell Publishing, 1969-73.   Vietnam.   None noted.

Ogden, Richard E.,  GREEN KNIGHT, RED MOURNING;  New York: Zebra Books, 1985.  0-8217-1626-3   Vietnam, autobiography.  None noted.

Owen, Joseph R.,  COLDER THAN HELL, A Marine Rifle Company at Chosin Reservoir;  New York: Ivy Books, 1996.   Korea, 1950   97-93361   0-8041-1697-0
p.128, Man had 'hunch' that Chinese would attack that night;
p.129, Loud voice told one Marine to get out of hole, "and stay out of there." He stayed out. When attack began at 0030, one of first Chinese mortar rounds landed in the hole. [Note: In Feb. 1965 as a volunteer firefighter, a voice told me that a fatal accident would occur.  Four hours later, a young man was killed at the 'pre-determined' site. The incident initiated my investigations into paranormal perception. RWF]
p.181, "'...There are gooks close by. I can feel them.'  He was never wrong."
p.220, "'Gooks all around us. I can feel them up there. Lots of them.'  I saw no sign of them until we took a chow break..."

Parker, Jr., James E.,  LAST MAN OUT, A Personal Account of the Vietnam War;  New York: Ballantine Books, 1996.  Index.  00-190008   0-8041-1941-4
p.70, Setting a minefield;
p.86, "...we felt we were getting closer [to the enemy].... he felt we were being watched..."  Enemy command-detonated a mine;
p.107, "We felt someone was watching us all the time."  "...we were walking over an extensive network of tunnels...";
p.195-6, "...because I loved them in a way only soldiers at war can know...";
p.282, "...prediction about an impending attack on Saigon..." [Before the final collapse-- 1975.].

Parrish, Robert D.,  COMBAT RECON, MY YEAR WITH THE ARVN;  New York: St. Martin's Paperbacks, 1991.  Vietnam.  0-312-92713-4   90-49212
p.23, Booby-traps;
p.29, ARVN corruption;
p.49, Booby-trap failure;
p.76, Bogus awards for valor;
p.164, Tet 1968, intelligence failures, successes;
p.169, VC take shelter in gov friendly villages, we attack;
p.185, Poor ARVN unit performance;
p.199, Counter-battery radar;
p.272, Radio based intelligence;
p.276, "...I could sense the VCs presence... Everyone sensed that we were about to make contact...".

Parry, Col. Francis Fox,  THREE-WAR MARINE;  New York: Jove Books, 1989 [Pacifica Press, 1987].  0-515-09872-8    None noted.

Perry, Tony, LA Times-Washington Post Service, "Stepping out from ambush"; Portland: The Sunday Oregonian, Feb. 13, 2000, p.D4.  "Chuck Mawhinney had more confirmed enemy kills than any other Marine sniper in the Vietnam War; now he shares his tales of war"  [Rather poor title, as snipers preferred to stay hidden. bf]
"As a sniper, Mawhinney had an uncanny ability to guage distance, moisture, weather and terrain--factors that determine how much a bullet will rise or drop during flight..." "'When you fire, your senses start going into overtime: eyes, ears, smell, everything,' he said.  'Your vision widens out so that you see everything, and you can smell things like you can't at other times...'"

Peters, Dr. Bill,  FIRST FORCE RECON COMPANY, Sunrise at Midnight;  New York: Ivy Books, 1999.  Vietnam.  Very enjoyable.  0-8041-1873-6   98-93276
p.39, "...They had... tried to read each other's minds...";
p.57, Marines used big CH-46 helo to insert recon team [??];
p.59, Hush in jungle signals enemy presence; "'NVA, and lots of them'";
p.75, Sgt. Ayers'  advanced patrol techniques;
p.83, "...and the intuition of a well trained patrol... negated the need to talk.";
p.91, "...my eyes wide, senses peaked...";
p.108, Idiotic insertion of team into old firebase occupied by NVA;
p.125, Strong intuitive element saves man;
p.152, Using 'instinct' to select unfamiliar men;
p.156, "...I've got a bad feeling about that direction...";
p.169, Command's inability to handle intelligence load;
p.175, Two patrols intentionally meeting at night in jungle; "...Today, I know it was a miracle."

Picciotto, Richard, with Daniel Paisner,  LAST MAN DOWN;  New York: Berkley Books, 2002.  A Firefighter's Story of Survival and Escape from the World Trade Center.  2002-019522  0-425-18677-6
p.15, "...a plane had crashed into the tower... I knew that this was no accident.  I knew this in my gut... in my heart... in my head.";
p.44, "The [south] tower came down... The moment I heard it I knew...";
p.221, "...trusting my gut... I moved on faith and instinct...".

Porter, Col. R. Bruce, with Eric Hammel,  ACE! A Marine Night-Fighter in WW II;  New York: Jove Books, 1985.  0-515-09159-6   None noted.

Prados, John, and Ray W. Stubbe,  VALLEY OF DECISION, The Seige of Khe Sanh;  New York: Dell Publishing, 1991.  0-440-21345-2  
p.16, Radio antenna blown into barbed wire worked much better;
p.22, Radio propagation, Marine Signal Intel. Unit, SESU;
p.285, Intuition on incoming rockets;
p.341, Acoubuoys and acoustic sensors;
p.345, Results of above;
p.520, Electronic battlefield.

Rejdak, Zdenek, Ph.D.,  "Parapsychology--War Menace or Total Peace Weapon?" in "The E.S.P. Papers, Scientists Speak Out from Behind the Iron Curtain," Sheila Ostrander and Lynn Schroeder, Editors, (1976).  Dr. Rejdak, Czech psychologist, is a principal presenter;  mentions U.S. Marines dowsing in Vietnam.  Czech military use in 1919!  [It was with great pleasure that I talked with Dr. Rejdak, in Milwaukie, WI, July 1993. See Harvalik, Bird, Fryer.]  Abridged from Periskop, Military Magazine, Prague, 1966.

Reynolds, Michael,  STEEL INFERNO, 1st SS Panzer Corps in Normandy;  New York: Dell Publishing, 1997.  WW II  0-440-22596-5    None noted?

Robbins, Christopher,  AIR AMERICA;  New York: Avon Books, 1979.  Inside story of CIA's airline.  78-9861   0-380-89909-4   None noted.

Roberts, Craig, and Charles W. Sasser,  THE WALKING DEAD, A Marine's Story of Vietnam;  New York: Pocket Books, 1989.   0-671-65777-1   None noted.

Rodriguez, Felix, and John Weisman,  SHADOW WARRIOR;  New York: Pocket Books, 1989.  CIA battles from Bay of Pigs to Vietnam.   0-671-72599-8   None noted.

Russell, Norman L.,  SUICIDE CHARLIE, A Vietnam War Story;  New York: Pocket Books, 1993.  0-671-52279-5
p.183-4, Comments on 'shell shock'.

Sack, John,  COMPANY C, The Real War in Iraq;  New York: Avon Books, 1995.  Gulf War   94-33406   0-380-71752-2
p.42, De-humanizing the enemy;
p.98, 'Born again' type Christian struggles with need to kill; his alertness saves lives;
p.121, In Kansas... Young had foreseen that K___ would be one of the casualties.  K___ stepped on a landmine;
p.131, Two men killed when trooper attempts to crack ovoid bomblette against tank.

Salter, Fred H.,  RECON SCOUT;  New York: Ballantine Books, 1994.  WW II   0-345-44693-3
p.7, "We soon learned that the horses were a lot smarter than us."
p.143, Comment on rivalry between generals;
p.146, "...I'd learned that to survive, a person must think and act like a cat..."
p.226-29, Notes on how to survive while on patrol; be AWARE;
p.291, Comments on soldier's attitude in the Vietnam war.

Santoli, Al,  EVERYTHING WE HAD, An Oral History of Vietnam; New York: Ballantine Books, 1981.   80-5309   0-345-30336-9   None noted.

Sasser, Charles W., and Craig Roberts,  ONE SHOT--ONE KILL, American Combat Snipers, WW II, Korea, Vietnam, Beirut;  New York: Pocket Books, 1990].   0-671-68219-9 
p.8, "'...I felt eyes watching me...'";
p.11, Note on toilet habits while on patrol;
p.12, "'...It made me suspect a trap...'";
p.14, "'he's still there,' I whispered, 'I can feel him.'";
p.15, "'I experienced a strange feeling...  I suddenly knew that if I didn't shoot now I'd never have another opportunity...'" [He would have been dead.] "'...It had to be that sixth sense working...'";
p.30, "...If you grew up outdoors, you knew the difference [of movement] between animals and man.";
p.39, "...I had learned to memorize every detail of terrain after one quick peek...";
p.45, Dread of facing more machine guns and snipers;
p.55, Sniper, "...defecating in his pants to keep from moving...";
p.61, "'My guts tell me he is out there watching and waiting,' Zaitsev commented...";
p.129, Target senses the sniper;
p.133, Abysmal marksmanship training for recruits;
p.139-, Carlos Hathcock, destroying a company of NVA recruits;
p.162, Marine injured when he interfered with thieving rock ape;
p.168, Laying out a sniper's range card;
p.169, Firing across or near an obstacle alters perception of source of fire; effects of weather on ballistics;
p.170, Sight-in for 450 yards;
p.191, Dealing with the killing; With a price on his head, "I felt like somebody out there was watching me...";
p.195, About a wounded man, "'...It was like he knew he was giving me life when he gave me his pistol...'" [It saved his life.];
p.196, "'...Your awareness triples...'";
p.197, The enemy soldier stared at his hiding place, perhaps sensing that to react would mean his own death;
p.207-10, Inching through the grass, enemy patrollers pass 15 feet to either side; After dark, one soldier nearly stepped on him;
p.212, "...I mentally pulled myself into my 'bubble' where nothing could distract my attention...";
p.213, "'...Recon has tapped all the NVA phone lines...'".

Sasser, Charles W.,  RAIDER;  New York: St. Martin's Paperbacks, 2002.  One man, four POW rescue raids in WW II, Vietnam.  Good read.   0-312-98249-6
p.27, "...They quickly developed a close working relationship that depended more upon instinct and understanding of each other than upon spoken communication...";
p.31, "...he actually felt his senses sharpening and coming alive...";
p.106, "...[His] imagination felt Jap eyes glaring at him...  He turned it off and felt his other senses sharpening...";
p.130, Heightened senses, night, in enemy territory... [As the point man for the raid on POW camp at Cabanatuan; see Ghost Soldiers, etc.];
p.152, "...Either the sentry possessed some acute sixth sense or the moon playing peek-a-boo with the clouds revealed something suspicious... he shouted a ringing challenge...";
p.212, "'I don't like this one, sir,' Rowe confided... He had this feeling." [They were sucked in a trap; he was taken prisoner.];
p.274, Effects on men of political aspects of war;
p.315, When headlines of the Son Tay raid were broadcast, she knew her husband was involved, again.

Sasser, Charles W.,  THE 100th KILL, A Novel of Vietnam;  New York: Pocket Books, 1992.   0-671-72713-3   None noted.  Interesting.

Sasser, Charles W.,  ALWAYS A WARRIOR, The Memoir of a Six-War Soldier;  New York: Pocket Books, 1994.  0-671-78931-7  
p.76, E&E training, brainwashing, snake phobia;
p.181, Fragging officers;
p.199, "Danger was something you sensed after a while..."
p.241, "...if there was one thing an enlisted man spotted faster than a chow line, it was chickenshit [behavior]."
p.280, "The military under whatever uniform had its darkside."
p.249-303, An amazing, disheartening tale of corruption and incompetent officers, Eighth Infantry Div., Germany, 1991.

Schneider, Ches,  From CLASSROOMS TO CLAYMORES, A Teacher at War in Vietnam;  New York: Ivy Books, 1999.  99-90017   0-8041-1871-X   None noted.

Schwarzkopf, Gen. H. Norman, with Peter Petre,  It doesn't take a hero;  New York: Linda Grey Bantam Books, 1992.  Autobiography, Vietnam, Gulf War.  Index includes landmines.  92-20762   0-553-08944-7   E840.5.S38A3
p.117, "...It was a kind of out-of-body experience, as though I stood watching... while..."
p.121, Comment on advisor's protocol, responsibility, and ARVN reliability;
p.128, Dream premonition of being wounded, was hit next day;
p.169-72, Terror in mine field, wounded, awarded Silver Star.

Sheppard, Don,  RIVERINE, A Brown-Water Sailor in the Delta,1967;  New York: Pocket Books, 1992.  One of the best narratives.  0-6671-79691-7
p.57, Failure of ARVN to prosecute battle effectively;
p.271, Failure to provide US forces with available intelligence.

Shook, John H.,  ONE SOLDIER;  New York: Bantam Books, 1986.   0-553-26051-0 
MUST READ for the serious student of the Vietnam era: incompetent officers writing fitness reports for good officers who refused suicidal orders; scams that bled the system, withholding food an supplies from troops in the field.
p.8-21, Inadequacies of basic training;
p.99, "Every man at the table hates the war and despises the Army.";
p.111, a man is killed by another trooper when someone doesn't get the word...;
p.157, "...combine to give me a feeling of wariness." [Enemy opened fire.];
p.188-190, "Someone is staring at me.  I turn to meet the eyes..." leads to an interesting exchange of fire [See Jim Morris, War Story and Andy McNab, Bravo Two Zero];
p.225, Base defenses are good... if guards awake;
p.242, "the [base defense] radar is broken down fifty percent of the time..." and doesn't work during storms.

Sledge, E. B.,  WITH THE OLD BREED AT PELELIU AND OKINAWA;  Novato, CA: Presidio Press, 1981.  WW II.  Index.  One of Top Ten books of Marines at war. The carnage and filth endured by enlisted Marines in battle.  Reread, 2003.
 The late author and book recently memorialized (2001) in a History Channel documentary, Sledgehammer: Old Breed Marine.
Sledge's widow commented on how to awaken a combat veteran--whisper his nickname in his ear.  [Then the wife/mate can desensitize him by adding "I love you".] 
p.11, Sleep deprivation: "...Combat guaranteed sleep of the permanent type only.";
p.12, "...our hearing became superkeen..."; "...The ear training also proved to be an unscheduled dividend..." for combat;
p.38, Japanese targeted corpsmen;
p.41, NCO disciplines Lieutenant on firing range;
p.42, "...I felt that... God had issued him to the Marine Corps...";
p.73, Expectation of banzai charges--not fulfilled;
p.93, "Suddenly, I heard a loud voice say clearly and distinctly, 'You will survive the war!'" [The others heard nothing.]; "...I believed God spoke to me that night on the Peleliu battlefield..."
p.97, Frontal assaults result in high casualties--and medals for the commanders;
p.147, Japanese document notes fatigued condition of Marines;
p.148, Mutilation of Marine corpses enrages men;
p.164, Red Cross girl greets troops just off battlefield, "...I resented her deeply.";
p.270, Coping with extreme fatigue;
p.305, Poorly trained replacements suffer extreme casualties.

Smith, Eric McAllister,  NOT BY THE BOOK, A Combat Intelligence Officer in Vietnam;  New York: Ivy Books, 1993.  93-91592   0-8041-0796-3  
p. 29, Examples of incredibly inept handling of captured documents;
p. 43, ignorance of certain courtesies creates problems for reserve officer;
p. 52, tendency of some officers to claim ignorance when informed of significant problems, rather than to correct the problem;
p. 86, "People were flipping out with alarming regularity."
p. 88-89, Description of mid-level officers who would prefer to not hear of a problem rather than to confront and solve it;
p. 95, re: highly inefficient motor pool facilities which hamstrung personnel whose duties required mobility;
p. 185-189, Psychological break-downs resulting in severe abuse of prisoners.

Smith, Gary R.,  DEMO MEN, True Stories from the Military's Elite Bomb Squads;  New York: Pocket Books, 1997.  WW II thru Gulf War.  0-671-52053-9   None noted.

Smith, Gary R., and Alan Maki,  DEATH IN THE JUNGLE, Diary of a Navy SEAL;  New York: Ivy Books, 1994.  Vietnam.  95-79867   0-8041-1341-6  
p.41, "...I only heard the ringing in my ears..." [Apparently natural 'white noise.']; "...Then I heard someone speak, which startled me until I realized the voice was only in my mind. It said, "Be careful, Smitty.";
p.104, "...I was keyed up. I had a strong premonition that [this] night would be the night. Somebody was going to lose his future." [Enemy probably killed.];
p.197, "...I had a strong feeling someone would die that [this] night. My instincts told me this... it wasn't going to be me..." [Enemy killed.];
p.212, Totally ignored by most civilians unless they wanted something--usually money;
p.231, "...knowing in my guts that some people were going to die before we got out of there..." [Enemy killed.];
p.232, "...I smelled the faint odor of nouc mam... confirmed once again that my senses of hearing and smell were extraordinary...";
p.233, "...Dexamil caused an alert high; but then abnormal drowsiness... not good...";
p.253, Inexperienced platoon sent to very dangerous area; were hit hard;
p.270, "...a gut feeling was speaking to me loud and clear. I just knew the enemy was coming..." [Enemy killed.].

Smith, Tom (Thomas L.),  EASY TARGET, The Riveting True Story of a Scout Pilot in Vietnam;  New York: Onyx (Penguin Group), 1997.  [Presidio Press, 1996]  0-8041-19301-6 
P.320, Radar locates source of incoming mortar fire.

Smith, Warner,  COVERT WARRIOR, A Vietnam Memoir;  New York: Pocket Books, 1996.  Fighting the CIA's secret war in SE Asia and China, 1965-67.  0-671-01430-7
p.25, Re the effects of stress on judgement and sensory input;
p.113, Re lying to a man about to embark on a very dangerous mission.

Spaulding, Richard D.,  CENTAUR FLIGHTS;  New York: Ivy Books, 1996.  96-94816  0-8041-1560-5  A Cobra pilot in Vietnam.  None noted.

Spencer, Ernest,  Welcome to Vietnam, MACHO MAN; New York: Bantam Books, 1989 [Corps Press, 1987].   0-553-27900-9   None noted.

Starinov, Col. I.G.,  OVER THE ABYSS, My Life in Soviet Special Operations;  New York: Ivy Books, 1995.  Translated by Robert Scruggs.  95-94026   0-8041-0952-4   From Bolshevik Revolution thru WW II.  None noted.

Stavisky, Samuel E.,  MARINE COMBAT CORRESPONDENT, WW II in the Pacific;  New York: Ivy Books, 1999.  99-90437   0-8041-1865-5   None noted.

Stoffey, Col. Bob,  CLEARED HOT!  A Marine Combat Pilot's Vietnam Diary;  New York: St. Martin's Press, 1992.   0-312-92941-2   None noted.

Stroud, Carsten,  IRON BRAVO, Hearts, Minds, and Sergeants in the U.S. Army;  New York: Bantam Books, 1995.  94-22187   0-553-57234-2  Interesting history of 1st Infantry Div and Fort Riley, KS.  Thru the Gulf War.
p.71-74, Description of weapons, land mines; problems from desert heat; culture clash;
p.101, Oil vs U.S.-Saudi relations;
p.175, Russian fighting doctrine.

Terry, Wallace,  BLOODS, An Oral History of the Vietnam War by Black Veterans;  New York: Ballantine Books, 1984.  83-42775   0-345-31197-3

Trotti, John,  PHANTOM OVER VIETNAM;  New York: Berkely Books, 1984.  Air war in Vietnam.  0-425-08084-6   None noted.

Vetter, Jr., Lawrence C.,  NEVER WITHOUT HEROS, Marine Third Recon Battalion in Vietnam, 1965-70;  New York: Ivy Books, 1996.  96-95314   0-8041-0807-2 
p.142, "'It's kinda like [he] knew, and I knew it, too, that we were gonna get hit...'"
p.155, "'You could feel their eyes boring holes in you, but they were not choosing to hit you just yet.'"
p.176, "...[he] could normally see beforehand what was going to happen to the patrol..." (He correctly predicted when the patrol leader would be shot.)
p.216, "The Reconners invariably felt the presence of enemy eyes boring holes in their backs..."
p.284, [A voice in the night told a Marine to prepare a grenade for throwing. Moments later he threw the grenade at a suspicious noise. An enemy sapper was silhouetted by the flash.]
p.297-300,  An extremely unusual encounter.

Volkman, Ernest, and Blaine Baggett,  SECRET INTELLIGENCE, The Inside Story of America's Espionage Empire;  New York: Berkley Books, 1991 [Doubleday, 1989].  0-425-12008-2  
p.58, Coonawarra, Australia, 1942, "...[listening] technicians discovered that the area's unique geology allowed them an astonishing range... including Germany..."
p.64, 1919, Herbert Yardley solved tough cypher problem: "...the solution finally came... in a deep sleep."
p.72, US/Great Britain Agreement, 1947; 
p.73, 1945/46 "...Moscow knew everything there was to know about the American atomic bomb...";
p.88, 'Stalin allowed 1944 Warsaw ghetto uprising to be crushed';
p.91, 'The man most responsible for "McCarthyism" was J. Edgar Hoover.' [Note: Having INVESTIGATED the roots of McCarthyism, that statement supplies a major missing piece to the puzzle. bf];
p.92-93, 1947, Truman's "loyalty program" [Another piece of the puzzle.];
p.95, "Hoover... stopped just short of calling the former President of the United States [Truman] a Communist."
p.135-37, 'By Thanksgiving 1967, two Army intelligence officers correctly forcasted the 1968 Tet offensive in Vietnam.' [They were ignored.];
p.179, "1963... RCA Global pioneered the use of computerized magnetic tape..." a major advancement;
p.182, NSA's illegal activities, technology;
p.186, "...overhead detection satellites that 'read' and track the distinctive electronic signal of every Soviet nuclear submarine." [This is most likely capturing an inherent signal given off by enriched nuclear materials. bf]

von Luck, Hans,  PANZER COMMANDER, The Memoirs of Col. von Luck;  New York: Dell Publishing, 1989.  0-440-20802-5   None noted.

Wade, Leigh,  THE PROTECTED WILL NEVER KNOW;  New York: Ivy Books, 1998.
97-94544   0-8041-1713-6   Special forces recon in Vietnam.
p.117,  Intuition forecasts (multiple) patrol activities;  Montagnard soldier foresees own death.

Wade, Leigh,  TAN PHU, SPECIAL FORCES TEAM A-23 IN COMBAT;  New York: Ivy Books, 1997.  Vietnam, 1963.   96-94967   0-8041-1616-4
p.3, "This ill-fated operation...  Several of us... were uneasy about it from the beginning..." [Poor, rushed planning. It was a disaster.];
p.40, "'...so basically, you'll be outnumbered and outgunned...'";
p.50, "...My sense of hearing seemed to have become suddenly very acute...";
p.70, "...I could actually feel all of my physical senses grow and expand... eyesight... hearing... smell...";
p.126, "His article... was the prototype for the many twisted, biased, antiwar pieces that were to follow...";
p.136, "...was probably the first M-79 used in combat..." [September 1963];
p.160, "...I've got a really bad feeling about this operation..." [See p.3];
p.163, Air support provided too late--might have prevented disaster;
p.171, Nov. 1, 1963, revolt against Diem government;
p.192, VC in the militia group kill guards, camp overrun.

Walker, James W.,  FORTUNE FAVORS THE BOLD, A British LRRP with the 101st;  New York: Ivy Books, 1998.  97-95365   0-8041-1600-8
p.160, "...always expecting the attack that never came."
p.170, "...I had the feeling that this mission was jinxed."
p.225, "...when I got an uneasy feeling in the pit of my stomach."
p.231, Comments questioning purpose, leadership.
p.259, "...I was getting some bad feelings about using the trail."
p.268, "...due to my uncanny ability to sense trouble coming..."
p.291, "...told me about his recent premonition of death."

Walsh, Michael J., Lt.Cmdr. USN (Ret.) and Greg Walker,  SEAL!  New York: Pocket Books, 1994.  Vietnam, etc.  0-671-86853-5 
p.13, How to hide in public, no direct eye contact;
p.22, SEALs improve as alcohol consumption drops;
p.27, Importance of conditioning;
p.57, "...Only the simple succeeds in combat...";
p.58, Trainees terrify girls in USA.
p.67, Intuitive mother;
p.72, Sensing a trap when others are oblivious, correct;
p.85, Good and bad of eye-to-eye contact;
p.86, "...[He] could read me like a book... when in danger [he could see] the hair on the back of my neck [stand] out so straight...";
p.103, Don't trust US Army any more than ARVN;
p.106, "...I focused my attention elsewhere so as not to give off bad vibes [to enemy]... we had practised... using our peripheral vision..." [See Jim Morris, War Story and Andy McNab, Bravo Two Zero];
p.115, Corruption;
p.125, Phoenix program, more corruption;
p.128, GVN policy of using bombs against citizens rather than rooting out VC; CGAP intel program worked;
p.144, VC infrastructure; advisors forced to lead from the rear;
p.145, Misinformation to U.S. public; "...the most effective program against the VC was being dismantled by idiots..."
p.161, Avoiding staring, using peripheral vision;
p.176, Higher echelon interference prevented freeing of U.S. troops held as prisoners;
p.182, Intelligence photos not available because a request for them would compromise the mission;
p.190, "I didn't trust the former VC... I was getting that little feeling that this would be a bad day..." [Ambushed on way out.];
p.213, Problems with finding and correcting Navy security weaknesses;
p.214, Special warfare community, more security problems;
p.230, Misuse of assets, poor intelligence and planning costs lives on the Grenada mission;
p.234, CIA notifies Russians three days before Grenada;
p.240, "...A civilian airliner... would also make an excellent flying bomb and could be hijacked...";
p.241, A merchant ship could also be used against us... anything from a Douh [sic] to a pleasure cruiser...";
p.244-, Beirut, Lebanon operations.

Warr, Nicholas,  Phase Line Green, The Battle for Hue, 1968;  New York: Ivy Books, 1997.  Marine Lieutenant, Vietnam; autobiography, indexed.  Strong candidate for Top Ten Vietnam era books.  98-93465   0-8041-1869-8

On a page directly behind the dedication, there are two quotes regarding politicians and battle: The first, Sun Tzu, 500 b.c., begins:
   No evil is greater than commands of the soverign from the court. . .

The second quote ends:  . . .Jesus H. Christ, why can't they stick to kissing asses and babies?
    Overheard from pinned-down Marines, Hue, 1968

2nd Lt. Warr led his platoon of 51 men in the first U.S. Marine assault inside the Citadel.  By next day 8 were dead and 20 were wounded bad enough to require evacuation. His remaining troops were assigned to other platoons; Warr became an observer. A few days later, he replaced a wounded officer and continued fighting.  When it was over, only seven of the 51 walked out.

While observing, and listening to wounded and dying Marines around him, his only companion behind a low wall was a dead dog: "The dead dog had been a perfect companion throughout that long afternoon, as he had never given me any problems, or even made one smart-ass remark, although I am sure that much of what I said to him that afternoon deserved serious rebuttal." (p.141)

There were too many items to keep track of in this book, but here are some:
p.7-8, Time distortion; "...started giggling... couldn't help it... nothing funny... probably saved my life...";
p.20, Hyper alertness, even while sleeping;
p.36, "The constant worry... [of being wounded] ...started to dissipate...";
p.60, "...the personality that I eventually came to know as 'the observer,' stepped out of my body and moved several feet away from me...."
p.63, A Marines change of peception regarding the people after villagers failed to warn of a booby trap. Marines died.
p.89, As a man began to do something very dangerous... "he... became slowly aware of tension in the air... noticed that every man within eyesight was intently focused on him...";
p.90, "...a moment when your entire being goes into slow motion and your sensory input goes to levels never before experienced. Sights and sounds are extraordinary in their clarity and persistence..."
p.94-5, "...The kneeling men were the only people in this group with at least the sense to get down (their many years of military service obviously provided them a sixth sense of danger signals that were--from the strained expressions on their faces--firing off at will)..." [The command group was lost, and had taken them into extremely dangerous territory.  They may have been moments from annihilation when Warr called their attention to the fact. Common sense alone should have been an indicator of the extreme danger.  Undoubtedly the hackles were rising on the backs of several necks.]
p.112, Riveting account of author's thought processes upon stepping through a doorway to find his men lounging in a 'kill zone.'  His screamed warning was too late; enemy ambushers opened fire from as little as thirty feet. [An example of group oblivion? They knew they were approaching the enemy.];
p.135, Comment:  Insanity of the 'rules of engagement.'
p.141, An afternoon talking with a dead dog;
p.148, Comments on murder of civilians by NVA;
p.249, Comments on being 'on point.'  "...Marines of Charlie One had a sixth sense about it..." [See p.112 above.].

Waterman, Steven L.,  JUST A SAILOR;  New York: Ballantine Books, 2000.  A Navy photographer and diver in combat and in salvage operations.  00-105352   0-8041-1937-6
p.97, Re installing hydrophone system in the Azores;
p.114, Note on very early UDT operations in Vietnam;
p.211, "...an ultrasonic device that could hear air leaks, no matter how small..."
p.216, NR-1, the Navy's smallest nuclear sub;
p.249, Item regarding leadership testing;
p.253, UQC wireless underwater communications system.

Watson, James, and Kevin Dockery,  POINT MAN;  New York: Avon Books, 1993.  Navy SEALs in Vietnam.  93-20226   0-380-71986-X   None noted.

Watson, Chief James "Patches", with Kevin Dockery,  WALKING POINT;  New York: Avon Books, 1997.  Navy SEALs in Vietnam.  96-31032   0-380-72648-3 .
p.114, Feb. 1964, training w/ 'suitcase' nukes;
p.128, Source of "Gulf of Tonkin Incident";
p.198, China Lake weapons depot, 40mm grenade launchers.

West, Bing,  THE VILLAGE;  New York: Pocket Books, 2003 [1972].  Vietnam.   One of Top Ten Vietnam books.  0-7434-5757-9
p.23, Fear during night patrols;
p.83, "...Alerted by instinct, he had turned his attention...";
p.95, "...a shift in the night sounds... the frogs..." The enemy were approaching;
p.114, Villagers forced to ignore patrollers, for fear of being denounced to VC;
p.119-20, Cautious enemy point man apparently senses [or smells] ambush at night, retreats;
p.226, "...It was a battle fought... at such close quarters [and at night] that both sides used their senses of smell and hearing as much as their eyesight...";
p.235, The VC point man... "...and his suspicion [of trouble] was evidently so strong that..."  ...He was shot, stopping a major attack before it began;
p.250, "...the Marines smelled... so the Viet Cong could avoid them.";
p.309, Senior commanders failed to understand the nature of the war;
p.333, The VC sapper, leading the penetration, worked carefully through the wire; a single bullet, between his eyes, stopped the attack;
p.340, Patrolling in the dark... "...Foster... had the uneasy feeling that he was being stalked... was convinced that he was outclassed... he stopped... refused to budge... the man came looking for him...".

Wilson, George,  If You Survive;  New York: Ivy Books, 1987.  U.S. Army officer, WW II.  Index.  86-91844   0-8041-0003-9  
p.22, Death premonition [Accurate];
p.26, 'Hunch' to have men carry extra grenades pays off;
p.46, 'Compulsion' causes him to move; moments later machine-gun fire rips spot where he had been;
p.101, "...many of the veterans were keenly aware of everything near them...";
p.102, Failure of generals to exploit the advantage...;
p.112, Landmines descripion;
p.118, Landmine tragedy, bravery;
p.155, "...this fellow didn't ring true to me..." --faked battle fatigue;
p.239, Unqualified leaders thrust into battle; deadly results;
p.245, "...the captain asked me to go [to briefing] in his place..." Captain suffered from depression, possibly from accurate death premonition.

Yarborough, Col. Tom,  DA NANG DIARY;  New York: St. Martin's Paperbacks, 1990, 2002.  Vietnam.  Index.  0-312-98493-6 
p.46, "...The key was in developing situation awareness, a sort of sixth sense for evaluating everything going on around you.";
p.47, Pave Way, laser guided bombs [April 1970];
p.75-76, Memorizing minute details of miles of trails...;
p.113, Political aspects;
p.129, "...he seemed to have a sixth sense and an uncanny ability to..." "...[his] sixth sense... probably saved my life...";
p.201, "...a knack for listening to all five radios at once..." "...while my mind's eye projected ahead...";
p.213, Controller notices that team is being herded into trap; team leader continued direction, wounded, died of non-serious wound;
p.237, Trail sensor info;
p.299, Doppler radar, FLIR systems;
p.319, Diary item, why men fight, etc.

Yedinak, Steven M.,  HARD TO FORGET, An American with the Mobile Guerrilla Force in Vietnam;  New York: Ivy Books, 1998.   98-92407   0-8041-1809-4
p.86, Dream forecasts ambush.
p.120, C-130, 3 engines quit.
p.121, ONCE AN EAGLE, "Hack's favorite book."

Young, Darryl,  The Element of Surprise, Navy SEALs in Vietnam;  New York: Ivy Books, 1990.  89-92452   0-8041-0581-2
p.4, Failure to check damaged helo resulted in crash;
p.42, Vision at night;
p.116, Mistreatment of Vietnamese;
p.117, Grenade thrown into truck by kid;
p.154, Incredible luck at avoiding trip-wired booby traps;
p.156, "But my time was coming; I just knew it..." [Wounded later];
p.182, "...so the Vietcong picked several people from the village and cut off their heads.";
p.187, Tension made sleeping difficult, relieved by smoking pot;
p.199, ARVN troops supply bomb-making material to VC;
p.227, SDVs - swimmer delivery vehicles.

Young, Paul R.,  FIRST RECON--SECOND TO NONE, A Marine Recon Battalion in Vietnam,1967-68;  New York: Ivy Books, 1992.  Candidate for Top Ten Vietnam books.  92-90616   0-8041-1009-3
p.46, Drinking bad water without allowing time for halazone tablets to do their job;
p.59, "...I couldn't get my thoughts off the hills surrounding us... the enemy..."; poor choice of landing zone by the brass...; "It was then that I made the decision never to land in an LZ I had had bad feelings about... Again, I had the feeling that a dozen pair of eyes were watching my every move..." [Early next day they came under fire.]
p.82, Concerned about spending night at present location...  "When the feeling wouldn't go away, I asked for extraction, something I hadn't done before..."; Feeling guilty when no enemy appeared... "...but... the location was too exposed for comfort..."
p.85-8, "I did not like our newly assigned [area]..."; Upon landing, many signs of enemy presence.;  "...All of us could sense the enemy's presence...  The tension grew...  Then the jungle exploded."  One man was pinned down, but escaped unhurt--his pack was shot off his back--received Silver Star for his actions..
p.90, Poor communication, one man left on hill--temporarily;
p.96, "...at night I found myself deeply troubled by the picture of my daughter's face in the sky...";
p.124, "...But since shots were always being fired in the jungle..."  Disregarded. [Error, these were signal shots, as events proved.];
p.126, "...the permanent state of fatigue that had settled over most of us...";
p.138, Problems with artillery fire missions;
p.162-3, Marine defector lures other Marines to capture, death;
p.165, Taking food, etc. from Montagnard village;
p.167, M-16 problems, praise for Stoner system;
p.171, Death premonition [accurate]; unearned medals for officers;
p.181-2, "...I felt that Charlie [VC] was around..." [true]; American Samoan Marine mistaken for enemy, badly wounded;
p.192-3, M-16 problems, extraction problems reduced after firing 1200 rounds;
p.218, Colonel orders disastrous frontal assault;
p.237, Lost in fog, gives false position reports;
p.244, Tet truce, firing continues.

Zumbro, Ralph,  THE IRON CAVALRY;  New York: Pocket Books, 1998.  A history of tanks.   0-671-01390-4
p.181, Comment on star navigation in the desert.

Zumbro, Ralph, and James Walker,  JUNGLETRACKS;  New York: Pocket Books, 1989.  NOVEL.  Vietnam.  0-671-66418-2
p.123, Ghost in a tank?;
p.201, Friends meeting friends in the jungle at night. [Extremely dangerous and difficult].


Hutchens, Maj. James M., BEYOND COMBAT; Chicago: Moody Press, 1968. 68-31200 Schell, Jonathon, THE VILLAGE OF BEN SUC; New York: Vintage Books, 1967. Unread to date. Tourison, Sedgwick, PROJECT ALPHA, Washington's Secret Military Operations in North Vietnam; New York: St. Martin's Press, 1995. 95-17380 0-312-96262-2 Unread to date.
Return to Paranormal Perception Page.