pipe pipe
Pipe Organs of Oregon
...a unique web-offering visualizing notable pipe organs of Portland.

First Presbyterian Church
Corner 12th and Alder
Portland, Oregon
Jaeckel Organ, completed 2000
Jaeckel Organ

Dr. Jon Stuber, Choir Director and Organist

Great Organ, Manual II, 58 keys
  1.  Montre 16'  58 pipes of 50% tin
  2.  Montre 8'    58 pipes of 50% tin
  3.  Salicional 8'   58 pipes of 50% tin
  4.  Flūte harmonique 8' 12 pipes wood; 46 of 75% tin
  5.  Bourdon 8'   18 pipes of wood; 40 of 15% tin
  6.  Prestant 4'   58 pipes of 15% tin
  7.  Flūte  4'      58 pipes of 15% tin
  8.  Quinte2 2/3'    58 pipes of 50% tin
  9.  Doublette  2'    58 pipes of 15% tin
10.  Tierce 1 3/5'    46 pipes of 50% tin
11.  IV-VI Fourniture 1 1/3'   312 pipes of 50% tin
12.  V Cornet harmonique  8'   195 pipes of 50% tin
13.  Trompette 16'   58 pipes with 15% tin resonators
14.  Trompette  8'   58 pipes with 50% tin resonators
 
Swell Organ, Manual III, 58 keys
15.  Bourdon 16'     24 pipes of wood;34 of 15% tin
16.  Diapason 8'     5 pipes from #17; 53 of 50% tin
17.  Viole de gambe 8'    58 pipes of 50% tin
18.  Voix céleste 8'      49 pipes of 50% tin
19.  Cor de nuit 8'  12 pipes of wood; 46 of 15% tin
20.  Prestant 4'   58 pipes of 50% tin
21.  Flśte octaviante 4'   12 from #20; 46 of 50% tin
22.  Piccolo 2'      58 pipes of 50% tin
23.  II Cornet 2 2/3'   92 pipes of 50% tin
24.  IV Plein-jeu 2'    232 pipes of 50% tin
25.  Basson 16'         58 pipes with 50% tin resonators
26.  Trompette harmonique 8'  58 pipes with 50% tin resonators
27.  Basson-hautbois 8'      58 pipes with 50% tin resonators
28.  Voix humaine 8'     58 pipes with 50% tin resonators
29.  Clairon harmonique 4'   58 pipes with 50% tin resonators
 
Positive Organ, Manual I, 58 keys
30.  Principal 8'   58 pipes of 50% tin
31.  Flśte ą fuseau 8'  12 pipes of wood; 46 of 15% tin
32.  Prestant 4'  58 pipes of 15% tin
33.  Flśte douce 4'  58 pipes of 15% tin
34.  Nasard 2 2/3'  58 pipes of 15% tin
35.  Doublette 2'  58 pipes of 50% tin
36.  Tierce 1 3/5'  58 pipes of 15% tin
37.  IV-V Plein-jeu 1 1/3'  271 pipes of 15% tin
38.  Dulcian 16'  58 pipes with 15% tin resonators
39.  Trompette 8'  58 pipes with 50% tin resonators
40.  Cromorne 8'  58 pipes with 15% tin resonators
 
Pedal, 30 keys
41.  Soubasse 32'   30 pipes of wood
42.  Montre 16'   30 pipes from #1
43.  Violon basse 16'   18 pipes of wood;12 of 50% tin
44.  Soubasse 16'   18 pipes from #41; 12 of wood
45.  Principal 8'  30 pipes of 50% tin
46.  Flūte conique 8'  7 pipes of wood; 23 of 15% tin
47.  Flūte ouverte 4'  30 pipes of 50% tin
48.  IV Fourniture 2 2/3'   120 pipes of 15% tin
49.  Contrebombarde 32'  12 wood resonators; 18 of 50% tin
50.  Bombarde 16'  18 from #49; 12 with 50% tin resonators
51.  Posaune 16'   30 pipes with 15% tin resonators
52.  Trompette 8'  18 from #50; 12 with 50% tin resonators
 
Couplers
 Great to Pedal
 Positive to Pedal
 Swell to Pedal
 Swell to Positive
 Swell to Great
 Positive to Great

Accessories and design features
Detached low-profile terraced console, adjustable bench 
Mechanical key action; electric stop action 
32-level combination system; 12 generals, 6 divisionals each division, 
  tutti, general cancel, sequencer, store/retrieve function, 
  3 coupler reversibles 
Tremulant, Clochettes, Rossignol, Wind stabilizers on/off 
Mechanical, balanced expression pedal for Swell division 
Main case and Positive case built of solid wood to match church woodwork; decorative carvings and ornamentation match that of the church interior 
Pedal keyboard is flat/parallel with sharp fronts in concave pattern; 
  curved keyboard also available 
Manual keys of bone, manual sharps and pedal sharps of grenadil, 
  pedal naturals of hard maple 
4 flat screen monitors (Sharp Laboratories) installed in console 
2 flat screen monitors installed on rear of Positive case 



Also, In the Chapel: Erben Organ
Richard Bond writes about the 1851 Erben: One of several stock models produced by the New York shop of the distinguished American organ builder Henry Erben, this organ was originally acquired by Calvary Presbyterian Church in San Francisco, but in the 1860's was donated to the Presbyterian Church in Portland (now First Presbyterian). It remained there until 1893, when it was given to Westminster Presbyterian Church, and in 1907 Westminster donated it to Vernon Presbyterian Chuerch, where it remained until the late 1940's.

At that time it was given to Lewis and Clark College, but for lack of a facility, graciously housed in the home of the then-College Dean, Lewis Thayer. When a small chapel space was found on the campus, a newer second-hand organ was acquired, and the Erben organ remined in the Thayer home until 1978 when it was moved to its present location following some renovations and repairs by Eugene organ builder Ken Coulter.

Tonally, the organ remains in its original condition, with the exception of the Keralophon** stop, lost at some point in the organ's travels and replaced by Mr. Coulter with a small-scale oboe. Repairs to the wind chest were necessary, a new blower provided (alas, there was not room to also replicate the original hand-pumped bellows), and the casework, originally a painted grain, was reconstructed and painted in the Greek Revival style popular in the mid-nineteenth century.

Back in its original Portland home!
By Lee Garrett, Prof. of Music, Lewis & Clark College

At Lewis & Clark there were continuing problems with climate controls in the room where the organ was placed, and lacking a suitable alternative, College Organist and professor of music Lee Garrett determined that the organ should return to its original Portland home. It was re-moved to First Presbyterian Church 137 years after its first arrival there! The Richard Bond Organ Company is continuing a program of repairs.

STOPLIST
8'  Open Diapason 
8'  Stopped Diapason treble 
8'  Stopped Diapason bass 
8'  Dulciana 
4'  Octave	
2'  Fifteenth 
8'  Keralophon **
8'  Bellows Signal 

** What is a "Keralophon?" Steven Irwin says this in his Dictionary of Pipe Organ Stops: "A foundation rank of 8' manual pitch, sounding with a moderately loud voice [that is] a hybrid tone between an open metal Flute and a Diapason. Horn-like character is given by some strength in the lower overtone range. It is heard from the Solo manuals of a few large church organs, but is usually associated with the organs of theatre and concert use. A round or rectangular slot in the tuning collar of each open metal pipe injects additioanl partials, but they usually do not become string-like."

First Presbyterian Church, Portland is also reachable on the World Wide Web.



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